Cactus and Tender Succulents forum: A rainbow bursts cristata problem?

Views: 291, Replies: 6 » Jump to the end
Name: Zachary Loper
Peoria, AZ (Zone 10b)
zicee
Nov 25, 2015 7:20 PM CST
I have this cactus for a few months and when it got it looked like it had a fungus problem but that was cured before it was shiped to lowes and before I got it. Every since then its been really great until now.
Thumb of 2015-11-26/zicee/22eef3


Thumb of 2015-11-26/zicee/4fdbb6


Thumb of 2015-11-26/zicee/4f547c

Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Region: California Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Composter
Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener Xeriscape
Image
tarev
Nov 25, 2015 8:15 PM CST
Hello zicee! Typically, I would say it might just be corking, showing old age, but it depends too on the growing conditions you have been providing it. I see it has a good root system and in a coarse media which is good.
Now if you can answer some questions:
1) Where are you growing this plant, indoors or outdoors?
2) If grown indoors, can you describe orientation of natural light it gets, is it by a north, west, east, south window? Or are you providing supplemental light?
3)How often were you watering the plant? During late Fall to winter, cacti will slow down and approaches dormancy so less to no watering for them. Sometimes that browning part is just the plants reaction of being too wet near soil level, so it is important to really wait for the media to be dry before watering, during its active growing time in summer.

You can also try to gently poke that brown area with a toothpick, if it seems too soft and oozing, then it is really sick, try to apply cinnamon and let it callus and dry.

If it is just firm and hard, I would think as I said earlier it is just corking. Leave it alone for now, keep warm and dry.




[Last edited by tarev - Nov 25, 2015 8:15 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #996120 (2)
Name: Zachary Loper
Peoria, AZ (Zone 10b)
zicee
Nov 26, 2015 12:49 AM CST
Ok I did the poking and it not oozing anywhere. You actually might be right about the corking. I actually never know that a Cristata can do that I always thought every other types but cristata can do that. And ur questions:
1) outdoors
2) none of those but outside its basically in morning sun and afternoon sun with a little shade cover it.
3) during growing season its 2-3 times a month. But since end of September I stoped watering it.

[Last edited by zicee - Nov 26, 2015 1:03 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #996220 (3)
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Region: California Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Composter
Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener Xeriscape
Image
tarev
Nov 26, 2015 1:31 PM CST
Okay at least no oozing. You said you have it outdoors. Not knowing where you are, what is typically your overnight temperature? Some succulents can bear up to 30F to 32F as long as kept very dry, and oftentimes, that browning will manifest too if it is starting to feel too cold. At times when temps are cold, humidity is high. So not the ideal situation for them. They do get cold burn too.
Name: Deborah Pryor
Orangeburg, SC Zone 8a (Zone 8a)
Don't Sweat the Small Stuff!
Charter ATP Member Amaryllis Region: United States of America Tropicals Seed Starter Plumerias
Plant and/or Seed Trader Peonies Lilies Irises Hummingbirder Echinacea
Deebie
Nov 26, 2015 2:39 PM CST
Tarev, I don't understand what you mean by cold temps and high humidity being a problem for succulents. Confused Could you please elaborate for us newbies? I'm all ears!
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Region: California Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Composter
Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener Xeriscape
Image
tarev
Nov 26, 2015 4:50 PM CST
These succulents are naturally able to store water in their leaves, stems or roots. Most of the succulents, depending on what variety they are, go dormant when the temperatures go cold. Unfortunately, relative humidity is higher when it is colder, especially at night, there is no heat to make the water evaporate, and that will affect the succulents who likes to be on the dry side. But these varies depending on what type of succulent, some have good cold weather tolerances.

That is why I often ask, where is the plant being grown, indoors or outdoors, what type of container etc. etc..Environmental issues and handling affects them a lot. We often overlook the changing seasons, the variance in temprature and light duration which is very important to note when growing succulents, as we do with other types of plants we grow.
Name: Deborah Pryor
Orangeburg, SC Zone 8a (Zone 8a)
Don't Sweat the Small Stuff!
Charter ATP Member Amaryllis Region: United States of America Tropicals Seed Starter Plumerias
Plant and/or Seed Trader Peonies Lilies Irises Hummingbirder Echinacea
Deebie
Nov 26, 2015 6:31 PM CST
Thumbs up Thanks! Now I understand. Outdoors at night in areas where the relative humidity is high, there is no heat to make the water evaporate--bad for succulents that like to be dry. These plants are better kept indoors where it is warmer. I'll keep a close eye on those that I plan to keep under lights in my garage. Blinking

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Cactus and Tender Succulents forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by sunnyvalley and is called "Hair-raising"