Ask a Question forum: help for tropical hibiscus

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Name: Taqiyyah
Maryland (Zone 7a)
Container Gardener Winter Sowing Plant and/or Seed Trader Roses Salvias Seed Starter
Vegetable Grower Region: Mid-Atlantic
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lovesblooms
Jan 1, 2016 4:27 PM CST
I brought my double orange tropical hibiscus inside in November (long before temps started to drop). I put it near a front window, but it doesn't get much light of course with such short days. I watered it when dry. But starting last week, just about all its leaves started yellowing and starting to drop off, starting from the bottom. At the rate they're going, it'll be bald in a few days. It's not soggy, even at the bottom of the pot, where I've been watering it from a dish.

I'll admit I'm not too worried, since I've had this happen with other plants and they just regrew their leaves. But it's in the living room, and not looking good, so I want to try and reverse this. Otherwise I'll just lug it to the basement with the other plants in dormancy.

It's about three feet high from its pot, well branched. I'm thinking maybe it's having a hard time supporting all the foliage on short rations? Last year it was only about a foot high and it didn't lose nearly as much foliage at once.

Just thinking aloud. Any suggestions? Should I just leave it alone and bring it to the basement?
Name: Heath
sevierville TN (Zone 7a)
Beekeeper Houseplants Region: Tennessee
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plantcollector
Jan 1, 2016 5:05 PM CST
I would leave it alone it should grow the leaves back. Mine always did that when I brought it in for the winter
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Jan 1, 2016 6:00 PM CST
But check the backs of the leaves for spider mites, first of all. In their favorite dry conditions of a heated house, they can really get out of hand. If you just run a finger or thumb along the back of a leaf and it comes off stained a sort of yellow or brown color, you've got spider mites sucking the life out of those leaves.

If you put it down in the basement with other plants it could get really messy down there, should the spider mites get loose.

Let us know if you find some - should be an easy fix with soapy water spray and maybe a visit to your bathroom shower.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Heath
sevierville TN (Zone 7a)
Beekeeper Houseplants Region: Tennessee
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plantcollector
Jan 1, 2016 6:13 PM CST
dyzzypyxxy said:But check the backs of the leaves for spider mites, first of all. In their favorite dry conditions of a heated house, they can really get out of hand. If you just run a finger or thumb along the back of a leaf and it comes off stained a sort of yellow or brown color, you've got spider mites sucking the life out of those leaves.

If you put it down in the basement with other plants it could get really messy down there, should the spider mites get loose.

Let us know if you find some - should be an easy fix with soapy water spray and maybe a visit to your bathroom shower.


I forgot that hibiscus are a magnet for aphids and spider mites.
Name: Taqiyyah
Maryland (Zone 7a)
Container Gardener Winter Sowing Plant and/or Seed Trader Roses Salvias Seed Starter
Vegetable Grower Region: Mid-Atlantic
Image
lovesblooms
Jan 1, 2016 7:21 PM CST
Good reminder about spider mites. I've never had the problem before. I did check, and no mites (phew!) so I guess I'll just bring it downstairs.

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