Ask a Question forum: Little tomatos indoors

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Name: Elvis Bektasha
Tirana, Albania
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ElvisBektasha
May 31, 2016 1:35 AM CST
Hi to all,
My story is short,
i have seen in youtube that you can take a tomato, cut it in circle and put it in soil. add water frequently and voila, the seed that the tomato have starts developing.
i have done this with little tomatos, and everything is ok. but i think that i have too many plants for the pot i use.
Please see the picture attached and help me what to do. i am afraid that the plant will not grow anymore. Should i remove some of plants?
i think is important to mention that my plant is indoor, in my kitchen. the kitchen have big windows (was build for a balcony and then changed to kitchen) and is oriented toward east.
Regards


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[Last edited by ElvisBektasha - May 31, 2016 1:39 AM (+)]
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Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
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Weedwhacker
May 31, 2016 7:16 AM CST
Welcome to Garden.org, @ElvisBektasha !

Yes, I think you have way too many plants in that pot; you certainly got excellent germination. You should probably only have one plant in the pot -- I would use some scissors to cut most of the seedlings off near the soil line, rather than pulling them out (which can disturb the roots of the one you want to keep. I think I would also initially thin it down to 3 or 4 plants (leaving some room between those) and let them grow a bit more, then eventually just keep the one strongest plant. You'll also probably have to turn the pot every day or so to keep the plant(s) growing straight, as they will likely want to lean toward the light. Smiling
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Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
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dyzzypyxxy
May 31, 2016 10:05 AM CST
I agree One plant for a pot that size is the most you need, if you want to raise it for fruit. A bigger pot may be needed before the end of summer,too.

You might be able to pull some of the small plants from the outside of the clump without disrupting too much, and transplant to other pots, or give away to friends? As Sandy said, though, cut off most of them with scissors and just keep the one strongest plant undisturbed in that pot.

Tomatoes will really need a full day of direct sun, so if you are able to find a place outdoors in the sun for your plant you will have much better luck raising it to give you fruit.
Elaine

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Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
May 31, 2016 11:42 AM CST
Unless you are the Jolly Green Giant, that pot looks to be about 6 inches. To raise a tomato, you need a pot that will hold at least 2 or 3 gallons for a patio type and 5 gallons or more for a standard size. The size of the tomato is not an indication of the size of the plant.
Name: Lauri
North Central Washington (Zone 5b)
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lauribob
Jun 1, 2016 7:42 AM CST
Welcome Elvis! Also be aware that the tomato plant that comes from the seeds of a hybrid tomato may not be the same as the original tomato. Not necessarily a bad thing - it can be fun to see what comes up!
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Name: Celia
West Valley City, Utah (Zone 7a)
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Zencat
Jun 1, 2016 7:46 AM CST
I'll add one thing. If they're grown indoors, you'll have to pollinate the flowers yourself. There probably won't be any insects to do it. My mom did this in her apt. and she got a few fruits out of it.
Name: Elvis Bektasha
Tirana, Albania
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ElvisBektasha
Jun 2, 2016 10:50 AM CST
Thank you guys, you help me a lot, i am on the very beginning in garden.
i have another question. i have see a worm moving in the soil. is that normal??
where did it come from, and they are any possibilities that him can get out of the pot.
i thing he is not alone :p
i have that scary/disgusting feel when i see worms.

Regards, and thanks again, you are the best
Name: Lauri
North Central Washington (Zone 5b)
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lauribob
Jun 2, 2016 10:53 AM CST
Is it an earth worm (brown) or some other kind of worm?
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Name: Elvis Bektasha
Tirana, Albania
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ElvisBektasha
Jun 2, 2016 11:12 AM CST
yes, earth worm, brown.
he started moving when i touched it.
[Last edited by ElvisBektasha - Jun 2, 2016 11:13 AM (+)]
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Name: Celia
West Valley City, Utah (Zone 7a)
Pour vivre parmi les fleurs
Irises Garden Photography I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Butterflies Birds
Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Hummingbirder Plant Identifier
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Zencat
Jun 2, 2016 11:24 AM CST
Earthworms are beneficial so I would leave it alone.
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
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dyzzypyxxy
Jun 2, 2016 12:34 PM CST
I agree Although it's a little unusual to have earth worms in an indoor plant. Did you start your tomato planting in some sterile potting mix? There shouldn't have been any viable earthworm eggs in there, but it might have come from the tomato or somewhere else.

It won't do you any harm, and it won't smell or invade or come out of the pot. It will also make the soil better for the tomato plant.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Elvis Bektasha
Tirana, Albania
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ElvisBektasha
Jun 3, 2016 3:12 AM CST
dyzzypyxxy said: I agree Although it's a little unusual to have earth worms in an indoor plant. Did you start your tomato planting in some sterile potting mix? There shouldn't have been any viable earthworm eggs in there, but it might have come from the tomato or somewhere else.

It won't do you any harm, and it won't smell or invade or come out of the pot. It will also make the soil better for the tomato plant.


I used a bag of soil for flowers, i brought it at the flowers store, they tell me that the bag has inside all the needs, soil, fertilizer, etc etc.

Thank you guys
Name: Tom Cagle
SE-OH (Zone 6a)
Old, fat, and gardening in OH
Coppice
Jun 3, 2016 4:54 AM CST
Earth worm eggs come with organic material. I wouldn't worry about them much. For my plants they are on the beneficial list.

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