Plant ID forum: At base of Solomon Seal in west central WI

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Mayarabbit
Jun 6, 2016 7:38 PM CST
Two pics of unidentified grower in west central Wisconsin at base of Solomon Seal- any ideas? Near by leaves are not part of new plant
Thumb of 2016-06-07/Mayarabbit/556556
Thumb of 2016-06-07/Mayarabbit/d18490

Name: Tiffany
Opp, AL (Zone 8b)
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purpleinopp
Jun 7, 2016 4:56 AM CST
Some kind of mushroom/fungus.
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Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
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wildflowers
Jun 7, 2016 7:48 AM CST
What an interesting looking flower - it looks like a flower to me. Maybe a pistilate flower; I say that because it looks like an ovary in the middle. Since it's growing with Solomon Seal, its probably on a woodland floor, I'm guessing. Is the flower on just the stem without any leaves?

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[Last edited by wildflowers - Jun 7, 2016 8:08 AM (+)]
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Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
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wildflowers
Jun 7, 2016 8:18 AM CST
Also the coloring reminds me of Jack in the pulpit. Kind of.
May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

Name: Feng Xiao Long
Bogor, Java, Indonesia (Zone 13a)
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XiaoLong
Jun 7, 2016 8:18 AM CST
Interesting plants.
It looks like the flower have been cut or have been eaten at the top.

I imagine its an Arisaema. My wild guest Hilarious!
Edited to add : it looks like a rolled spathe at the base of 'the flower' at second photo.
[Last edited by XiaoLong - Jun 7, 2016 8:28 AM (+)]
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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Jun 7, 2016 8:21 AM CST
There's a second stalk behind the "flower", did that end with another flower? I'd wondered if it was parasitic or hemi-parasitic, maybe even on Solomon's Seal but I've been through my wildflower field guide and Googled with seemingly appropriate keywords but came up empty handed. I too was thinking not a fungus because it looks to have some chlorophyll in the stem, not sure it does though. Hopefully someone will recognize it.
Name: Feng Xiao Long
Bogor, Java, Indonesia (Zone 13a)
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XiaoLong
Jun 7, 2016 8:23 AM CST
wildflowers said:Also the coloring reminds me of Jack in the pulpit. Kind of.


We think abut the same plant. Jack in the pulpit is a kind of Arisaema Hurray!
Name: Leslieray Hurlburt
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HamiltonSquare
Jun 7, 2016 8:32 AM CST
It't appear that the tip has been taken off somehow. I agree with Long that it is an Arisaema.
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Name: Sue
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sooby
Jun 7, 2016 8:37 AM CST
HamiltonSquare said:It't appear that the tip has been taken off somehow. I agree with Long that it is an Arisaema.


It does look like that but shouldn't it have leaves?
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HamiltonSquare
Jun 7, 2016 8:44 AM CST
Image 1 shows where the remains of a petiole/leaf stalk. They would have been in the way of a top down photo. Just my take on it.
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Name: Sue
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sooby
Jun 7, 2016 8:55 AM CST
I'd wondered about that other stem - in the pictures I saw of various Arisaema the leaf stalk was thicker than the flower stalk which threw me off. Mayarabbit, did you remove the leaf to show the flower better? Or maybe something bit off both the spathe and the leaf! Do deer eat them?
Name: Jean
Prairieville, LA (Zone 9a)
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Moonhowl
Jun 7, 2016 8:55 AM CST
Ariseama triphyllum flowers before the leaves and there are a couple of green stems of a grass(?) that look to be snipped or broken

https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/flower/jack-in-the-pul...
Name: Evan
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eclayne
Jun 7, 2016 9:19 AM CST

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It looks like an Arisaema to me too. Is it growing in a garden or in the wild? U.S. Arisaema bloom with the peduncle growing from a pseudo-stem although it can sometimes be mostly underground. I don't see a p-stem but that does look like a petiole to the left.
Evan
Name: Jean
Prairieville, LA (Zone 9a)
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Moonhowl
Jun 7, 2016 9:40 AM CST
The flower looks to be "cleanly" cut rather than torn by teeth...plus I can't find any info that lists this flower as food. The berries are eaten by wild turkeys and rodents/mammals.

"BENEFIT
Use Wildlife: Birds and mammals eat the berries of this plant.
Use Food:Native Americans gathered the fleshy taproots (corms) as a vegetable. Roots, only when dried or cooked. Collect roots in early spring. Never eat roots raw as they can be intensely bitter and can cause blisters. Dry for at least six months before eating. Peel, cut into small pieces, roast in the oven for at least one hour and grind into a flour or coffee grinder until quite fine. Add the ground root to bread doughs or muffin batters. Thin slices of the root, dried for 3 months, can be eaten as snacks or with potato-chip dip. (Poisonous Plants of N.C. State)
Warning: Containing needle-like calcium oxalate crystals and perhaps other acrid substances, the berries, foliage, and roots of this plant will cause painful irritation of the mouth and throat if ingested. The roots can cause blisters on skin if touched. Because of needle-like calcium oxalate crystals in the underground tuber, it is peppery to the taste and causes a strong burning reaction if eaten raw. This unpleasant property can be eliminated by cooking. American First Nations gathered the fleshy taproots (corms) as a vegetable. (Niering)"

http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ARTR

Mayarabbit
Jun 7, 2016 10:08 AM CST
wildflowers said:What an interesting looking flower - it looks like a flower to me. Maybe a pistilate flower; I say that because it looks like an ovary in the middle. Since it's growing with Solomon Seal, its probably on a woodland floor, I'm guessing. Is the flower on just the stem without any leaves?



There are no leaves and just the 2 stems, one with the cylinder looking bud- I like the idea that the flower was eaten but it is clean, no munching looking marks


Mayarabbit
Jun 7, 2016 10:11 AM CST
sooby said:There's a second stalk behind the "flower", did that end with another flower? I'd wondered if it was parasitic or hemi-parasitic, maybe even on Solomon's Seal but I've been through my wildflower field guide and Googled with seemingly appropriate keywords but came up empty handed. I too was thinking not a fungus because it looks to have some chlorophyll in the stem, not sure it does though. Hopefully someone will recognize it.


No other flower- I also checked mushroom book and think the two plant stems make it appear not to be a fungus - although plenty of rain lately...I do have a Jack-in-the-Pulpit under another solomon's seal nearby and the two just don't compare- it must be a broken something?..will post if it changes appearance


Mayarabbit
Jun 7, 2016 10:13 AM CST
HamiltonSquare said:Image 1 shows where the remains of a petiole/leaf stalk. They would have been in the way of a top down photo. Just my take on it.


Nope, no leaves- just the two stalks, one with a cylinder - actually a bit transparent with reddish/purple veins -

Mayarabbit
Jun 7, 2016 10:15 AM CST
eclayne said:It looks like an Arisaema to me too. Is it growing in a garden or in the wild? U.S. Arisaema bloom with the peduncle growing from a pseudo-stem although it can sometimes be mostly underground. I don't see a p-stem but that does look like a petiole to the left.


I think it Jack in the Pulpit too now that I read such good posts:) It is in a garden bed but the bed has another Jack in it that was a volunteer. The reddish purple that doesn't show well in the pics is a good clue... never saw one so young before..


Mayarabbit
Jun 7, 2016 10:18 AM CST
Thanks everyone...if it is NOT a Jack-in-the-Pulpit, I will post another pic of what it does do- unless it is eaten or otherwise goes missing- forest is all around

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