Ask a Question forum: yellow crookneck squash

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Name: Debbie
Ventura County, CA
Cat Lover Region: United States of America Salvias Region: California Herbs Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Region: New York Vegetable Grower Organic Gardener Bookworm Garden Ideas: Level 1
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ChefDebbie
Jun 11, 2016 9:43 AM CST
Good morning, all. I got a 6 pack of the crooknecks & planted them all on the same day. Why are some growing like crazy & flourishing, while others don't seem to be getting any bigger, but have little baby fruits on them? Thanks!
A transplanted New Yorker now living in Southern California.....
Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jun 11, 2016 10:10 AM CST
Welcome! to NGA

Somehow the conditions are different: sunnier or shadier, dryer or wetter, better soil.... Its impossible to get exactly the same conditions but even that is no assurance they will all grow equally well. Annuals (which squash are) have only one thing in mind - ensuring that there will be a next generation. The ones that are smaller but producing small fruits have decided its time to make sure that happens. The bigger ones aren't feeling that stress to reproduce quite yet (but hopefully they will eventually) and so are growing bigger before fruiting.

Hope this helps.

Daisy
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Jun 11, 2016 10:53 AM CST
Just one more thought to add to Daisy's good comments - I would pinch off the baby fruits on the small plants, feed them some high nitrogen fert (half strength for new plants) and maybe shade them for a few days. It might stimulate them to grow more leaves before they try to bloom again. Might !! . . . they may have had smaller root systems to start with, then all were stressed by transplanting and any stress can trigger the bloom cycle for the reasons Daisy stated above. Now the plants are putting energy into making fruits instead of leaves which is somewhat self-destructive.

They probably won't mature enough to make fruits big enough to harvest anyway so trying this won't hurt, but might help.

Btw, pictures are always a big help in answering questions, and it's also good to complete your profile with your location, so your questions can get better answers according to your climate and weather conditions.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Debbie
Ventura County, CA
Cat Lover Region: United States of America Salvias Region: California Herbs Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Region: New York Vegetable Grower Organic Gardener Bookworm Garden Ideas: Level 1
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ChefDebbie
Jun 11, 2016 11:06 AM CST
Thanks for the info! I'm in Oxnard, CA which is 1 hr north of Los Angeles. They are all planted in the same area... Some are bumpy & some smooth. Before planting them, I mixed into the soil used coffee grounds, eggshells & a product called 'Amend' by Kellogg Organics. I also submitted a photo (at least I thought I did but didn't work). Thank You!
A transplanted New Yorker now living in Southern California.....
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Jun 11, 2016 11:12 AM CST
Debbie, when you write a post, scroll down and right below the text box is a green button that says "Upload an image". Click on that, select your picture and a line of gibberish enclosed in [square brackets] appears that is the code for your picture. Then click "Finished".

Have you given the plants any additional nutrients, like fertilizer yet? What you added is good for soil conditioning but not enough to grow on. IF you're wanting to go all organic, an excellent, high nitrogen amendment is alfalfa pellets. It's available as horse food from any local feed store. Dig a couple of cups of that into the soil around your plants, or make a "tea" (well, it's more like porridge) in a watering can, let it steep for a couple of hours and water it onto the plants. (don't use a watering can with a strainer on the spout)

You still will need more nutrients, vegetable plants grow fast and use a lot of nutrients and water to produce anything. So feed those babies a good organic fertilizer as well.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
[Last edited by dyzzypyxxy - Jun 11, 2016 11:47 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1179279 (5)
Name: Debbie
Ventura County, CA
Cat Lover Region: United States of America Salvias Region: California Herbs Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Region: New York Vegetable Grower Organic Gardener Bookworm Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
ChefDebbie
Jun 11, 2016 12:54 PM CST
Thanks a million, Elaine. I thought that is what I did for the photo; will follow your instructions exactly. Will get that done so you can see the plants in question. It's so rewarding to enjoy the fruits of your labor. Yes, I like to keep my garden organic. Don't want that garbage on my plants, which eventually will be eaten. And whatever I'm unable to eat, I will be donating to my local food bank.
A transplanted New Yorker now living in Southern California.....
Name: Debbie
Ventura County, CA
Cat Lover Region: United States of America Salvias Region: California Herbs Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Region: New York Vegetable Grower Organic Gardener Bookworm Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
ChefDebbie
Jun 11, 2016 3:39 PM CST
Elaine, when I hit 'upload photo', there isnt anything within the brackets you mentioned. Maybe it would be possible to send it as an attachment via email? I appreciate your kindness.
A transplanted New Yorker now living in Southern California.....
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
dyzzypyxxy
Jun 11, 2016 4:02 PM CST
When you hit the "Upload an image" button it should take you to your Pictures files where you will select the picture you want to post. If you're posting from a tablet or your phone, I can't help you much further than that. Too many variables. If I post from my Android phone it takes me to my Gallery of pictures.

Sorry, I don't give out my e-mail address to anyone on a public forum. But to get the greatest benefit from this site you will need to learn how to post pictures anyway.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Debbie
Ventura County, CA
Cat Lover Region: United States of America Salvias Region: California Herbs Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Region: New York Vegetable Grower Organic Gardener Bookworm Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
ChefDebbie
Jun 14, 2016 3:02 PM CST

Thumb of 2016-06-14/ChefDebbie/5859ba

A transplanted New Yorker now living in Southern California.....
Name: Rita
North Shore, Long Island, NY
Zone 6B
Charter ATP Member Seed Starter Tomato Heads I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Vegetable Grower Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Birds Garden Ideas: Master Level Butterflies Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Roses Hummingbirder
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Newyorkrita
Jun 14, 2016 3:21 PM CST
They all look pretty good. My squash never all grow at the same rate, some are always much larger and grow faster much like yours are doing.
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
dyzzypyxxy
Jun 14, 2016 3:29 PM CST
Hurray! Way to go Debbie! So your picture is worth a thousand words and eliminates a lot of speculation - the smaller plants are a bit too close together, I think. If you planted them on a "hill" of really rich compost, (like a couple of wheelbarrows full) you might get away with putting them that close together. The big, dark green, lush one has a nice space all on its own, and (who knows Shrug! ) maybe deeper or more fertile soil there as well.

The second-best one, far right is a little bit crowded by whatever that is behind it but is doing ok. The other three, well as I said before, I'd remove all the flowers and give them a shot of fertilizer or at least a couple of watering cans of alfalfa pellet porridge, to see if you can give them a boost towards growing a few more leaves before they start producing. No doubt about it, you've gotta feed those babies for them to do anything.

Even if only two plants survive, I think you'll have plenty of squash, though. They're not quite as prolific as zucchini but pretty close.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Debbie
Ventura County, CA
Cat Lover Region: United States of America Salvias Region: California Herbs Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Region: New York Vegetable Grower Organic Gardener Bookworm Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
ChefDebbie
Jun 14, 2016 6:09 PM CST
Don't know what I did differently but am glad I did it. There's hope for me yet! Behind are a marigold & some other pretty flowering plant. The huge one didn't seem to be growing at one point; then all of a sudden seemed to grow all at once. I'll space them out a bit more & feed them like you said. You're awesome, thanks a million. Hurray! Thumbs up Big Grin Thank You! I tip my hat to you.
A transplanted New Yorker now living in Southern California.....
Name: Debbie
Ventura County, CA
Cat Lover Region: United States of America Salvias Region: California Herbs Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Region: New York Vegetable Grower Organic Gardener Bookworm Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
ChefDebbie
Jun 15, 2016 8:19 AM CST
Good morning, all. I carefully dug up one of the smallest crookneck plants (trying to avoid cutting the roots) & relocated it in a bigger area. Will be buying an organic fertilizer today & feeding all of them. Do these plants tolerate being transplanted well? I know some vegetables don't like having their roots disturbed, like beets. Also, can the same fertilizer be used on green zucchini?
A transplanted New Yorker now living in Southern California.....
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
dyzzypyxxy
Jun 15, 2016 8:57 AM CST
As long as the nutrient analysis is balanced i.e. 10-10-10 or similar for the three main nutrients it should be fine for anything. You can get fertilizer in any variation of these numbers but the higher the numbers are, the less of it you will need to use so usually it's a better value. If you can get a micro-pelleted type also, it will save you having to remember to re-apply so often.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Rita
North Shore, Long Island, NY
Zone 6B
Charter ATP Member Seed Starter Tomato Heads I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Vegetable Grower Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Birds Garden Ideas: Master Level Butterflies Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Roses Hummingbirder
Image
Newyorkrita
Jun 15, 2016 9:18 AM CST
Water, water, water and they should be fine transplanted. Any fertilizer that states suitable for veggies should do on all your squash, eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, etc.

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