Classifieds and Group Buys forum: The Hosta Farm Needs Our Help

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Name: Rick Moses
Derwood, MD (Zone 7b)
Region: Mid-Atlantic Region: Maryland Hostas Ferns
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RickM
Jun 20, 2016 12:38 PM CST
I posted this last night under a different thread. I though it best to pull it out separately so I can keep track better.

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A company that I buy hosta from, The Hosta Farm, is having an 'emergency' sale. Last winter, the had a devastating snowfall, which crushed most of their greenhouse space. If that wasn't enough, his daughter was diagnosed with cancer earlier this year. Needless to say, the guy is in a real bind.

The 35mm plugs of the following varieties are being offered for $3.85 each. If you buy hosta mail order, you know this is a fantastic deal. He is planning on shipping these the first week of July.

Varieties available:
Thumb of 2016-06-20/RickM/6288d3

I was thinking maybe we could do a a couple of group buys and save on shipping costs. We can organize by proximity for pick-up. For example, I can receive for Gaithersburg/Rockville/Silver Spring/Frederick, etc. If someone wanted to set up for PA, NY, DE, etc. that would be great.

I can put the initial purchase on my credit card, and you can pay me when you pick them up.

Anyone interested?

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He is also offering a 'buy now, use later' deal on gift certificates. If you buy a certificate now and wait until fall to use it, he will double the value. $20 gets you $40, etc.

If you are interested in the gift certificates, you can buy these directly at http://www.thehostafarm.com/cls/html/gift-cert.html


What a man needs in gardening is a cast-iron back, with a hinge in it. Charles Dudley Warner
Name: Teresa
South central KY (Zone 6b)
Consider the lilies of the field
Seller of Garden Stuff Irises Hostas Region: Kentucky Lilies Peonies
Region: United States of America Garden Photography Vegetable Grower Hummingbirder Cat Lover Heucheras
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bluegrassmom
Jun 24, 2016 6:18 AM CST
Rick, is this closed or the thread moved?
Name: Rick Moses
Derwood, MD (Zone 7b)
Region: Mid-Atlantic Region: Maryland Hostas Ferns
Image
RickM
Jun 24, 2016 6:55 AM CST

Hey Teresa, you can still place an order at http://www.thehostafarm.com/cls/ . In addition to the great price, he also has $7.00 flat rate shipping on the entire order.

Gift certificates are still available at http://www.thehostafarm.com/cls/html/gift-cert.html
What a man needs in gardening is a cast-iron back, with a hinge in it. Charles Dudley Warner
Name: Becky
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Butterflies Seed Starter Container Gardener
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Birds Ponds
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beckygardener
Jun 24, 2016 10:06 AM CST
There is a red banner flashing across the screen saying, "They are not taking orders until we catch up on shipping".

So are they taking orders at all?
What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters, compared to what lies within us.
Garden Rooms and Becky's Budget Garden
Name: Becky
Sebastian, Florida (Zone 10a)
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Daylilies Hummingbirder Butterflies Seed Starter Container Gardener
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Ideas: Master Level Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Birds Ponds
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beckygardener
Jun 24, 2016 10:13 AM CST
You might want to read this page:

https://www.saleforplants.com/blogs/news
What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters, compared to what lies within us.
Garden Rooms and Becky's Budget Garden
Name: Rick Moses
Derwood, MD (Zone 7b)
Region: Mid-Atlantic Region: Maryland Hostas Ferns
Image
RickM
Jun 24, 2016 10:55 AM CST
Hi Becky.

Yes, I'm aware of their shipping backlog as I am on their mailing list. When they announced the sale, he stated that he wants to get these orders out the first week of July. The link above is only for the special sale.

These plants were ordered before his daughters cancer diagnosis. If he were to cancel the grower order, he's looking at almost $2,000.00 in restocking fees, so he decided to 'fire sale' them to make room for other stuff coming in. As fate would have it, they were just getting back to normal from the winter disaster (they lost most stock and greenhouse space the winter of 2014/15 due to heavy snows) when his daughter's condition worsened. He's splitting time between the hospital and trying to save his business, which is his only source of income.

I actually have an outstanding order with them from their 'SaleForPlants' site for some unique hosta that I purchased back in the spring. Personally, I'm fine with the shipping delay on the order as I have to find room for the plants anyway. Whistling

Rick
What a man needs in gardening is a cast-iron back, with a hinge in it. Charles Dudley Warner
Name: Teresa
South central KY (Zone 6b)
Consider the lilies of the field
Seller of Garden Stuff Irises Hostas Region: Kentucky Lilies Peonies
Region: United States of America Garden Photography Vegetable Grower Hummingbirder Cat Lover Heucheras
Image
bluegrassmom
Jun 24, 2016 1:50 PM CST
Hurray! Thank You!
OH (Zone 5a)
Hostas
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Pandora
Jun 25, 2016 6:34 AM CST
Go Fund Me for Kim Rhodes
https://www.gofundme.com/helpship
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Identifier
Frillylily
Jun 25, 2016 7:56 AM CST
I guess I'm confused as to the size of these hosta, are they liners or larger plants? I understand them to be bareroot? or are they potted? for those of us not familiar with hostas- I don't know what a 35 mm plug is?
Name: Rick Moses
Derwood, MD (Zone 7b)
Region: Mid-Atlantic Region: Maryland Hostas Ferns
Image
RickM
Jun 25, 2016 9:34 AM CST
No problem Frilly. They are plugs roughly 1 1/2 inches in size. Liners are in the 2" range.

The illustration below is of the various cell trays used by growers. These hosta would have been grown in the 72-cell tray (highlighted in green.) I would suggest potting these up into larger pots with a well-draining 'soil' mix. Someone here on the NGA site said that the disposable 16oz plastic drink cups that you can get at a dollar store are great for starting plants. (I keep forgetting to get some every time I go to the dollar store!).

Before you put anything in the cups, poke a few holes in the bottom for drainage. Take a small-ish screw driver and heat the tip using your stove. When it is hot, push it through several cups at a time. Repeat the process until you have at least 4 holes.

Fill the cup 2/3 full with potting medium. Hold the plug so that the crown is about 1/4 to 1/2 inch below the rim and fill around with more potting medium. Once they're all potted, water them well.

Some are going to say "why bother, I'll just go to a big box store or nursery and buy larger plants." That''s fine. If you need something to fill a space now. (While on a trip to New England a couple of weeks ago, we picked up a nice, large hosta... at $33.00. It's like some smaller ones that we already have, but Larry wanted a 'big plant'. When I went to plant it, I removed it from the pot only to fine that it had been recently, within a week, moved from a 1 quart pot to a 2-gallon pot. The roots hadn't even started to spread out beyond the confines of the old pot.)

Something else to keep in mind is that we're headed into the really hot season. By getting smaller plants, you can put them somewhere where you will be able to monitor their health and water when needed, not when it's too late.

Late September through mid-October, plant out your new hosta into their 'permanent' home the garden. The few months they spent in pots will allow the roots to grow and develop, increasing their chance of survival during the winter.

I hope this helps.


Thumb of 2016-06-25/RickM/412a67

The following is from http://homeguides.sfgate.com/plant-plug-liner-care-54899.htm...

Plugs and liners are basically starter plants or seedlings available at greenhouses or nurseries. This means the delicate process of establishing a plant from a seed or cutting is done for you. Plugs are young plants that have been grown from seed in separate cells of greenhouse trays. Liners are young plants that are typically grown from cuttings. They are rooted in greenhouse trays like plugs, but these trays tend to be larger and narrower than plug trays.


Inspection
When you get your plugs and liners home, it is important to their health and the health of existing plants, to inspect each plant to ensure it is vigorous and free of pests and disease. Look for common insect pests such as aphids, spider mites, thrips and whiteflies. If unnoticed, these particular pests can populate your plants rapidly. Use a magnifying glass to inspect all parts of your plugs and liners. Light infestations can be rinsed away with water. Heavy infestations may make it necessary to destroy a particular plug or liner. Another option is to isolate the plugs or liners and treat with horticultural oils or insecticidal soaps prior to transplanting.


General Care
Plugs and liners require fresh air and should be kept in a well-ventilated and well-lit area that is free of cold drafts for about 24 hours after you bring them home. When you remove plugs and liners from their trays, do not remove the netting, as it keeps the soil and roots intact. This won’t inhibit root growth once the plug or liner is planted. Make sure that the plugs and liners are always upright, and not lying on their sides. Plant into the desired containers or beds as soon as possible but not before the soil has warmed enough for your particular plant to establish itself.


Preparing for Transplanting
Before you transplant plugs and liners into the garden, feed them in their trays with a liquid fertilizer solution that is labeled for feeding your particular plant. This helps promote early growth and can reduce transplant shock. Water your plants and liners to keep the soil moist, but not soggy until you are ready to transplant them into pots or your garden. If you’re keeping your plugs and liners outdoors, a shaded location can help prevent drying out of the soil and minimize problems. Harden off your plugs and liners before transplanting outdoors by placing them outside during the day and bringing them in at night. Do this for about two weeks.


Planting
Water your plugs and liners about one to two hours before planting. Remove the plug or liner from its tray by pushing up on the bottom. When you plant your plugs or liners, cover the netting with 1/4 to 1/2 inch of soil, but no more than this. If you are not yet ready to plant in the garden, transfer it to a small pot or a seed tray that is filled with general purpose compost. Water the planted plugs and liners thoroughly at planting and then do not water again until the soil feels dry. In the days following transplant, keep the soil consistently moist, but not soggy. After the first week, reduce watering to weekly intervals, or as required by your particular species of plant.

What a man needs in gardening is a cast-iron back, with a hinge in it. Charles Dudley Warner

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