Ask a Question forum: Ailing red flowering dogwood.

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Wilkeycj
Jul 2, 2016 6:23 PM CST
I inherited a lovely red flowering dogwood that is ailing. I am looking for some care/treatment advice.

I have included pictures of the leaves. They are showing reddish discolour at the tips and edges, browning at the tips, and the intervein areas are pale green.

I am assuming the tree might be suffering from dogwood anthracnose. I am treating that with a liquid copper spray every 10 days or so and have started removing some of the more severely damaged leaves. Am I on the right track with this?

Any thoughts about the pale intervein problem? The tree is in well drained soil that is also shared by a massive silver maple. A soil test suggested nitrogen and phosphorus depletion so I have been fertilizing with liquid fertilizer (there was a good addition of rich soil a month or so ago.) but no change in the mature leaves. Any suggestion?
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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Jul 2, 2016 6:56 PM CST
Welcome! If the intervieinal chlorosis is on the oldest leaves it suggests magnesium deficiency. Did your soil test include the secondary macronutrients like Mg? What was the soil pH?

Wilkeycj
Jul 23, 2016 11:04 PM CST
Thanks for your reply. I just noticed it. I am new to this form and didn't know how to get replies 😏
The PH is neutral to slightly alkaline. The soil tests I have done were too bad ick to pick up a magnesium deficiency. How do I correct for that?
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
Jul 24, 2016 5:05 AM CST
In the short term you could try Epsom salts, which is magnesium sulfate. There are longer term solutions but they depend on the level of other nutrients in the soil. For example Sul-Po-Mag can be used if potassium isn't already high, or dolomitic limestone if the pH isn't already high. Depending why your soil is somewhat alkaline you may not want to add more lime with the latter. If you're in the USA you could call your local Extension office and ask what they recommend as they know the soils in your area. It probably would be a good idea to get a lab soil test to find out for sure what the levels of various nutrients are.

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