Cactus and Tender Succulents forum: My first euphorbia needs a trim?

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Name: Cheryl
Kingwood, Texas (Zone 9a)
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ShadyGreenThumb
Jul 16, 2016 1:33 PM CST
I love the look of a euphorbia Geroldii "tree". My euphorbia has been blooming and growing well since I got it in February. Can I trim it back (at the risk of losing blooms) to make it more compact? Or do I wait til it's dormant? TIA I tip my hat to you.
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[Last edited by ShadyGreenThumb - Jul 16, 2016 1:33 PM (+)]
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Name: Kim Jacobi
Van Nuys, CA (Zone 10a)
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LAGardengirl
Jul 16, 2016 1:43 PM CST
Never trim a succulent in dormancy
LA Gardengirl
Name: Cheryl
Kingwood, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Greenhouse Composter Plant Identifier Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Amaryllis
Plumerias Ponds Foliage Fan Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tropicals Garden Ideas: Master Level
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ShadyGreenThumb
Jul 16, 2016 2:05 PM CST
Ok @LAGardengirl I will take that to say I should prune it now.
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Jul 16, 2016 2:34 PM CST
For what it's worth, I would generally prefer to prune succulents in dormancy unless I am interested in rooting the pruning as a cutting. Beyond just pinching, which you kind of want to do as early as possible during the season of active growth, to leave the minimum scar.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Jul 16, 2016 3:13 PM (+)]
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Name: Cheryl
Kingwood, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Greenhouse Composter Plant Identifier Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Amaryllis
Plumerias Ponds Foliage Fan Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tropicals Garden Ideas: Master Level
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ShadyGreenThumb
Jul 16, 2016 2:35 PM CST
Oh, my! What to do??? Confused


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Life is short, Break the rules, Forgive quickly, Kiss slowly, Love Truly, Laugh
uncontrollably, And never regret anything that made you Smile.
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Jul 16, 2016 2:40 PM CST
Nice. It looks pretty good to me as is, but you can try pruning one way or the other, and see what comes of it. Smiling

My rationale is similar to why one would prune apple or fig trees during their dormancy (ie. wintertime). When they wake up afterwards, they will focus their expansion on the remaining growth centers, resulting in less loss of energy to the plant and (maybe just a perceived) balanced recovery "from scratch". That's my crude understanding, but it has worked for me and it's the way one would prune the natives here, which go dormant in the summer (like E. misera).
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Jul 16, 2016 3:59 PM (+)]
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Name: Cheryl
Kingwood, Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Greenhouse Composter Plant Identifier Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Amaryllis
Plumerias Ponds Foliage Fan Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tropicals Garden Ideas: Master Level
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ShadyGreenThumb
Jul 16, 2016 10:17 PM CST
Thanks @baja_costero When in doubt I leave it be. I think when I got it it was just coming out of dormancy. It certainly wasn't as large as it is now. (I'll hunt for a pic) But the cuts seemed fresh on the branches. So maybe when it goes dormant is the answer? I will think on it and maybe get other opinions.

This was in Feb.
The thread "Euphorbia-what kind, please?" in Cactus and Tender Succulents forum
Life is short, Break the rules, Forgive quickly, Kiss slowly, Love Truly, Laugh
uncontrollably, And never regret anything that made you Smile.
[Last edited by ShadyGreenThumb - Jul 16, 2016 10:23 PM (+)]
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Bromeliad
Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier
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Baja_Costero
Jul 18, 2016 9:52 AM CST
One thing you should bear in mind, whatever you do, is that the sap of Euphorbias can be pretty nasty. So if and when you decide to make a cut, be sure to wear gloves and avoid getting the sap on your skin, especially on your face. That way you can avoid a rash or potentially more serious problems. I have no experience with this particular plant, and it could be innocuous, but it's good to keep Euphorbias at a safe distance when in doubt.

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