Ask a Question forum: Foundation planting

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Plantdummy
Jul 31, 2016 10:02 PM CST
I just bought a house and want to put a all season garden in. I live in zone 6a. My problem is our high porch with a lot of foundation showing and little space to garden in.
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Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
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sallyg
Aug 1, 2016 5:34 AM CST
Your foundation has been prettied up with paint, so you don't need to cover it all. Nice backdrop for light colored flowers, and/or variegated foliage. Shrubs - be careful and limit them, as so many can grow big. Can you dring the bed on the right out to the stepping stones? Or make it match the left.
Some initial thoughts.

I'd think some perennials, grasses, maybe some border annual along the front...

When does the sun hit there?
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)
Name: June
Rosemont, Ont. (Zone 4a)
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JuneOntario
Aug 1, 2016 7:08 AM CST
I suggest leaving enough space between the plants and the house so you can repaint the wall without having to step on your planting. I learned this the hard way!
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
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dyzzypyxxy
Aug 1, 2016 8:15 AM CST
It will help us a lot if you could let us know where you are, please? Fill in your profile with your city/state/country and then it will appear in all your posts. Just a zone really doesn't tell us anything except how cold it gets on average in winter. Summer heat, humidity, does it rain? the strength of the sun and day lengths all determine what will be successful for you. Also some info about your soil would help as well - is it sandy, clay or loamy? Have you had a soil test done?

Which direction does the front of your house face? This will impact what you can plant quite a lot.

You say you want an "all-season" garden but in zone 6a you will have winters that freeze so do you really want to plant all evergreens? The little Alberta spruce trees you have there are extremely slow growing, so you can't depend on them to make much of a statement for several more years. But you don't want to crowd or shade them out either.

There are some shrubs that stay fairly small, like red twig dogwoods. They come in beautifully variegated foliage, and when they lose their leaves in winter, their stems turn bright red, which can be really nice looking. Would something like that interest you?

Red Twig Dogwood (Cornus alba 'Elegantissima')
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
[Last edited by dyzzypyxxy - Aug 1, 2016 8:17 AM (+)]
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Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Native Plants and Wildflowers Region: Mid-Atlantic Composter Region: Maryland Birds
Cat Lover Dog Lover Region: United States of America
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sallyg
Aug 1, 2016 6:44 PM CST
Yellow twig dogwood, rather than the red, sounds awesome Thumbs up
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)

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