Carnivorous Plants forum: Transplanting Sarracenia

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Name: Ken
East S.F. Bay Area (Zone 9a)
Region: California
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CaliFlowers
Aug 22, 2016 6:41 PM CST
About 10 weeks ago I received a Sarracenia c.v. 'Abandoned Hope' with two 10" pitchers, and a small Venus Flytrap, c.v. 'B-52' from California Carnivores.

The Sarracenia shipped in a 3.5" pot, and I'd like to move it to a 6" pot, or maybe a 11" bog pot—maybe along with the Venus flytrap. I suspect that the roots of these things are fragile and fibrous. Is it better to just plug the existing rootball intact into the new mix, or should I try to gently wash & tease some of the old peat mix away first?

Afterward, should I shade it for a week or so? It has a new pitcher developing which is about 8" tall and still mostly "flat" but starting to open at the tip, and a couple of others that are 1" and 3" tall. While these new pitchers have been developing, one of the older pitchers seems to be leaning over a little, as if it might be declining. (it's still firm and very solidly attached to the crown) Should I cut the "leaner" off to lessen transplant shock? Is trimming these even done? Humidity is fairly low here, with 55° nights, 75° days and bright, cloudless skies.

Also, there's a lot of greenery starting to cover the surface of the B-52's planting medium. At first, they consisted of just the smooth leaves, then the spiky growth emerged. Is this sphagnum moss? (for scale, the smooth leaves are about 1/4" long)


Thumb of 2016-08-23/CaliFlowers/99bf57

Name: Brenden Reinhart
Flushing Michigan (Zone 6b)
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bhart90
Aug 22, 2016 6:50 PM CST
Wow, nice purchase with the abandoned hope, heard it's lovely!

Considering your in cali, I wouldn't be able to confidently give you advice, but what I DO know, leave the pitchers on if they are not moldy or brown, considering how many they put up a year, and how long it takes, leave it because it is still collecting light as NOT NOM.

You said 10 weeks ago you got it? Well, I hope it's in full sun by now, if not,should take a week roughly to get it acclimated.

I had my entire bog in the shaded forest, like a duma... and I literally dragged it into full sun like a duma....

Didn't burn them too much at ALLLLL . Maybe few dots, but nothing significant at all.

Those green growths thing are odd, I'd actually post in plant I d if you said they start out like that paddle leaf, then go spiky. Weird
Brenden
Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Aug 22, 2016 9:50 PM CST
Hi Ken,

I love California Carnivores - its one of my favorite go to places for carnivorous plants and knowledge.

Yes, replant the Sarracenia into its permanent home. Their roots are not fragile or touchy. I wouldn't wash off the old peat but when you take it out of the current pot, some of the peat is bound to fall away. Don't worry about that. The important thing is to plant the crown above the peat as it is now. If the crown is too low, the plant will rot. Yes, full sun but if its not there now, as Brenden said, move it slowly into more and more light.

Those little plants in your pot are bonuses. The feathery stuff is moss but the little spade leaved ones will grow into something else. I got them this year when I ordered a Drosera from CC and am still waiting to see what the something might be. I'll go out tomorrow and see if they suggest anything yet.

You live in the perfect location for Sarracenia. I have to work a little harder at maintaining mine outside year 'round. When I lived in California, they lived outside in pots year 'round but in Reno, they have all been transplanted into bogs. I cover them in the winter with burlap to keep them from being damaged by the freeze/thaw cycles of our Reno winters but that's about it.

Daisy
Name: Ken
East S.F. Bay Area (Zone 9a)
Region: California
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CaliFlowers
Aug 23, 2016 12:20 PM CST
Thanks for the replies. It's getting about 6 hours of direct exposure, sometime soon I'll move it to the south side of the house in order to maintain that, and that's where it'll stay. There, it will get sun from sunrise until at least 5 pm.

I made a swing past CC on Memorial Day, but they were closed. Still, the view through the fence was amazing. I'm definitely going back for a walk-through.

What I'm still not clear about is the amount of water they should be sitting in. Mine is in a 1/2" saucer which practically dries out every day (surface of the mix is always wet) but everything I've read indicates the crown should be less than two inches above the water level. So, if I have a 6" tall bog tray, 4" of water in a deep saucer would be fine? Is that kind of high water level more of a strict necessity or a strategy to reduce maintenance? How much standing water would be too much?
Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Aug 23, 2016 3:52 PM CST
I have always grown mine in water pots - no drainage holes. My inground bog has pool liner under it. Keep the crowns above the water level. If I was using saucers, I would make the saucers as deep as possible. They are bog plants - bogs are wet places.
Name: Ken
East S.F. Bay Area (Zone 9a)
Region: California
Image
CaliFlowers
Aug 23, 2016 10:16 PM CST
DaisyI said:I have always grown mine in water pots - no drainage holes. My inground bog has pool liner under it. Keep the crowns above the water level. If I was using saucers, I would make the saucers as deep as possible. They are bog plants - bogs are wet places.


Thanks. I like the idea of water pots too. Pot and saucer all rolled into one. I guess my hesitance to just submerge the entire container comes from having that accidentally happen when using regular potting soils. I understand that peat won't putrify if continuously submerged.

The only "bog" plants I currently grow are bulbs, Crinum calyptratum. They're happy in unamended garden dirt in a no-hole 2 gallon nursery pot, kept topped off with water.

I have read lots of advice to use about 30% perlite mixed in the peat. Is there any benefit to that? (other than the obvious conservation of peat) I don't see any perlite in my pots from California Carnivores, and the Sarracenia and Dionaea at Berkeley Indoor Gardens are growing happily in a sand/peat mix.

I saw your bog garden pictures in another thread. Very nice! How deep is your pond liner, and what's your soil mix?
Name: Daisy
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Aug 23, 2016 10:46 PM CST
My bogs are about 12 inches deep. I use 1/2 peat and 1/2 perlite. The added perlite keeps the peat from packing. I don't use sand because I can't figure out how to keep it from sinking out of the peat and becoming concrete.

When I start seeds, I use 100% peat.

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