Trees and Shrubs forum: Need help IDing a nut tree.

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Name: Tori
Dallas, GA (Zone 7b)
Region: Georgia Bee Lover Beekeeper Organic Gardener
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GardenGoober
Aug 28, 2016 8:52 PM CST
My husband noticed a tree on our property that has nuts on it. He thinks it is a walnut tree, but the leaf pattern does not look like the circular fern-like leaf pattern that our TN walnut trees have. Does anyone know if this is indeed a walnut tree? The nut has a pine-like scent. Thanks!

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"Let food by thy medicine and medicine be thy food." - Hippocrates
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
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ViburnumValley
Sep 9, 2016 3:34 PM CST
You are right, that is not a Walnut (Juglans sp.). That is one of the Hickory group, of which there are several native to southern states that look a lot alike. Carya is the botanical name for the genus.

The nut/seed looks too small to be either Carya ovata (Shagbark Hickory) or Carya laciniosa (Shellbark Hickory), but it could be any one of 4 or 5 other species like Pignut, Mockernut, Bitternut, and others. Georgia is fertile ground for these kinds of trees.

You can try to photograph additional parts of the plant, to help others here try to identify it further. Some of these closely related trees are only separated by numbers of leaflets on their compound leaves, or a bit of difference in the dormant buds, or by hairiness (or lack of it) on various parts like petioles, rachis, petiolules, or veins on the undersides of the leaves.

Entertain us with your photographic prowess, and we can all learn something. Show us more of where this tree is growing, and tell us some of who it hangs out with (friends, associates, heirs, and assigns forever...).
John
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Sep 9, 2016 4:00 PM CST
John, it's also being discussed on the Plant ID forum with more pictures:
The thread "Need help IDing a nut tree." in Plant ID forum
Name: Tori
Dallas, GA (Zone 7b)
Region: Georgia Bee Lover Beekeeper Organic Gardener
Image
GardenGoober
Sep 15, 2016 2:26 PM CST
ViburnumValley said:You are right, that is not a Walnut (Juglans sp.). That is one of the Hickory group, of which there are several native to southern states that look a lot alike. Carya is the botanical name for the genus.

The nut/seed looks too small to be either Carya ovata (Shagbark Hickory) or Carya laciniosa (Shellbark Hickory), but it could be any one of 4 or 5 other species like Pignut, Mockernut, Bitternut, and others. Georgia is fertile ground for these kinds of trees.

You can try to photograph additional parts of the plant, to help others here try to identify it further. Some of these closely related trees are only separated by numbers of leaflets on their compound leaves, or a bit of difference in the dormant buds, or by hairiness (or lack of it) on various parts like petioles, rachis, petiolules, or veins on the undersides of the leaves.

Entertain us with your photographic prowess, and we can all learn something. Show us more of where this tree is growing, and tell us some of who it hangs out with (friends, associates, heirs, and assigns forever...).


Hi John,
It's hanging out on the seedy side of the yard with the other nuts, squirrels and deer. Big Grin

Okay, here are some more pics...

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Thank You!

"Let food by thy medicine and medicine be thy food." - Hippocrates
[Last edited by GardenGoober - Sep 15, 2016 2:27 PM (+)]
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Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
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ViburnumValley
Oct 1, 2016 7:25 AM CST
I would say from the images presented thus far that this is NOT Shagbark Hickory, as suggested by others on the other thread. Carya ovata will have longitudinal strips of bark (up and down the trunk) peeling away at each end - on trees of the size you've shown. Your tree does not exhibit this trait.

I still say: take more pictures of key parts of your tree. It appears to be quite healthy, and you are able to reach branches, twigs, leaves, and buds. Prune off one or several, and lay them down where you can take exhaustive definitive images. I noted in my previous post that differences are often subtle, and you won't make out those traits from twenty paces.
John
Name: Tori
Dallas, GA (Zone 7b)
Region: Georgia Bee Lover Beekeeper Organic Gardener
Image
GardenGoober
Oct 1, 2016 8:13 PM CST
ViburnumValley said:I would say from the images presented thus far that this is NOT Shagbark Hickory, as suggested by others on the other thread. Carya ovata will have longitudinal strips of bark (up and down the trunk) peeling away at each end - on trees of the size you've shown. Your tree does not exhibit this trait.

I still say: take more pictures of key parts of your tree. It appears to be quite healthy, and you are able to reach branches, twigs, leaves, and buds. Prune off one or several, and lay them down where you can take exhaustive definitive images. I noted in my previous post that differences are often subtle, and you won't make out those traits from twenty paces.

Thanks John. I'll work on that. Smiling
"Let food by thy medicine and medicine be thy food." - Hippocrates

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