Ask a Question forum: Brugmansia

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Name: ninni
south east Texas (Zone 8b)
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ninni49
Sep 10, 2016 7:44 AM CST
I have a beautiful white fragrant flowering Brugmansia in a large pot in the yard. I took a cutting which has taken root and I am now going to plant it. My question is, can I grow it as a houseplant ? And if so, will it still go dormant. I live in south east TX.
I love to grow plants from seeds and have the most beautiful mango tree that I planted 2 years ago...It is about 4 feet now. A lemon tree that I planted at the same time Is growing out of control and I keep trimming it back to 7 feet. All grown in pots. Does anyone know if these fruit trees will set fruit ?
ninni49
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Sep 10, 2016 8:31 AM CST
Hi ninni and welcome Welcome!

Brugs grow and flower year 'round here in Florida, so I'd say you can certainly keep your new plant growing and maybe even blooming through the winter. Take it indoors around the time that your night temperatures start to fall into the 40's. If you let your house get somewhat cool at night, (60's?) it will keep the plant from getting 12 ft. tall and crowding you outa there, too. By the time it warms up next spring, you'll have a nice big plant ready to bloom for you all summer. Then in September just start another cutting again.

They love heat and humidity, and indoors they need as much direct sun as you can provide, so a south window would work well. The one trouble they seem to have indoors is spider mites. Keep a spray bottle of soap solution 1/2tsp. dish soap to a quart of water, and spray the plant, being sure to hit the undersides of the leaves. It's then a good idea to rinse the plant off, so another spray bottle with plain water will accomplish this or put it in your kitchen sink or shower.

When they're outdoors, you can just spray them with the hose in dry weather to keep the spider mites away.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Sep 10, 2016 8:44 AM CST
Oops, got carried away with your Brug question and forgot to continue with the fruit trees - Are you bringing them into the house in winter also? The mango, at least, will not do well with any frost at all. Not sure about the lemon as some varieties are hardy = they will "survive" but not necessarily thrive.

A tree started from a seed will take years to bloom and fruit, especially a mango - mine took 3 years and I started with a 3-yr old baby tree. The lemon, it kind of depends upon what variety it is. Was it a grocery store lemon that you got the seed from?

It also depends a lot on the weather - if we continue to have a run of warm-ish winters your plants may come along to blooming/fruiting size a little faster.

Another consideration with the mango is, they tend to want to bloom in the winter and early spring here, and you definitely will not have any pollinators for it if it's inside your house, so this further reduces your chance of getting fruit. Oh, and the flowers smell terrible (at least I think they do).

In summary, I'd say keep the lemon as they can make nice, pretty house plants that you can keep pruned down to size, and have beautiful fragrant flowers. The mango really isn't going to make a good indoor plant - it will very quickly be too big, probably make stinky flowers at the wrong time of year and most likely will never give you fruit.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: ninni
south east Texas (Zone 8b)
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ninni49
Sep 13, 2016 12:46 PM CST
Thank you Elanie...I sure appreciate your input....I keep both lemon and mango outside most of the year but bring them in if frost is expected...Although the lemon is growing so fast and so tall I have a hard time keeping up with it.... I like to keep it about 7-8 feet so I can bring it inside when I have to...Yes the seeds come out of the fruits I buy in the store...Not sure what kind they are...I am pretty sure it's not a Mayer lemon ..Here in Texas we get a lot of fruit from Mexico...Usually smaller ones and full of seeds ! I have planted so many, that are still small plants, I could grow an orchard. Also oranges and mandarines. The lemon tree is 3 years old but still has not set flowers...I was kind of hoping it would have happened by now...Just love the fragrance.
I will definatly try and grow the brugmansia as an indoor plant...The one I have outside is flowering and the fragrance is just heavenly ! The humidity is high here so no problems yet with spider mites.
Just love my plants...I was suprised how easy it is to grow coffee plants.
When we moved from Alabama to Louisiana many years ago I had a moving van just for all my "babies" .....smiles...Thank you again.
ninni49

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