Irises forum: Is it too late to plant iris

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Name: Kim
iowa (Zone 5a)
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kimmer
Oct 16, 2016 9:43 PM CST
Just was wondering if it was too late to plant Iris. It's been crazy here with work,kids and a death in the family. My gardening has fallen behind. Thanks! Kim
Name: Lucy
Hamilton, MA (Zone 6b)
irises
Charter ATP Member Cottage Gardener Enjoys or suffers cold winters Region: United Kingdom Region: Northeast US Irises
Region: United States of America
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irisarian
Oct 16, 2016 9:51 PM CST
I would suggest to plant next year in Iowa. Work on the condition of the bed until then.
Name: Kim
iowa (Zone 5a)
Birds Cat Lover
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kimmer
Oct 16, 2016 10:19 PM CST
My problem is that I still have some that I ordered still sitting in the garage. If I don't plant them won't it be to late next spring?
Name: Lilli
Copenhagen, Denmark, EU
Irises Roses Bulbs Winter Sowing Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Bee Lover
Dog Lover Region: Europe
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IrisLilli
Oct 17, 2016 2:28 AM CST
Pot them up and put them in a protected place outside during winter? That's what I do with iris that arrive this late.
You don't know if it will grow until you try!
Name: Tom
Southern Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Irises Vegetable Grower Butterflies Region: Wisconsin Keeps Horses Cat Lover
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tveguy3
Oct 17, 2016 3:22 AM CST
I planted several this late last year that I didn't get around to planting earlier. They all survived, and a few even bloomed. I'm not sure potting them and leaving them outside would provide them with many benefits IMHO. The roots would be warmer in the ground. You might have to weight them down with something like a rock or a brick to keep them from heaving out of the ground. I wouldn't wait any longer to plant them if possible though. Good luck and let us know the outcome next spring. Smiling
I am not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep; I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion. - Alexander the Great
Name: Tom
Southern Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Irises Vegetable Grower Butterflies Region: Wisconsin Keeps Horses Cat Lover
Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Daylilies Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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tveguy3
Oct 17, 2016 3:24 AM CST
P/S: I'd give them a good soaking over night before planting though. Just the roots, not the rhizomes.
I am not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep; I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion. - Alexander the Great
Name: John
Kansas City,MO (Zone 6a)
Region: Missouri Composter Enjoys or suffers cold winters Plays in the sandbox
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yadah_tyger
Oct 17, 2016 3:40 AM CST
I planted in November last year. I used some of the wood shavings vendors use as packing material as insulation around the rhizomes. Just enough light got thru for growth. Then at night I covered them with small plastic tubs. I did this for about 4 weeks, Then I just stopped covering them but left the insulation. They did great. But the ones I put in pots did not do well at all. But it was my first attempt at overwintering in pots. So I'm sure that is the reason they did poorly.

Blessings
When they call the roll in the Senate, the Senators do not know whether to answer 'Present' or 'Not guilty.' Theodore Roosevelt
Name: Bonnie Sojourner
Harris Brake Lake, Arkansas (Zone 7a)
Magnolia zone
Region: United States of America Region: Arkansas Master Gardener: Arkansas Irises Bulbs Seed Starter
Gardens in Buckets Garden Art Plant and/or Seed Trader Moon Gardener Garden Ideas: Master Level Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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grannysgarden
Oct 17, 2016 5:58 AM CST
I agree with Tom and John. If you do not want to keep them in pots indefinitely plant them in the ground. Put a brick or rock over the rhizome to keep it from heaving when the roots begin to push into the soil.
I love my garden.... and Jesus, and coffee, and naps.......
Name: Arlyn
Whiteside County, Illinois (Zone 5a)
Irises Beekeeper Region: Illinois Celebrating Gardening: 2015
crowrita1
Oct 17, 2016 6:05 AM CST
It's late for our zone, for sure, Kim....but, I'd follow Tom's advice....give them an overnight soak, get 'em in the ground, and find some rocks, bricks...or something, to use as "hold-downs. You won't need the "bricks" until the ground starts to freeze, though. After the soil DOES freeze, some pine needles, evergreen branches, or anything that won't 'pack down' could be used as a mulch to KEEP it frozen (it's the "freeze- thaw-freeze-thaw" that you need to avoid)until early spring, would help. Any mulch should be removed ....for us about the first of March, on the average.
South central PA (Zone 6a)
Irises Region: Pennsylvania
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DaveinPA
Oct 17, 2016 12:51 PM CST
Good advice Kim. I just received 2 varieties I am trying to nurse also. Started them in pots for about 2 weeks then will put into ground. Heaving here is bad especially with the high-in-the-ground planting I do because of the heavy clay soil, so anchors are good.
Name: Lucy
Hamilton, MA (Zone 6b)
irises
Charter ATP Member Cottage Gardener Enjoys or suffers cold winters Region: United Kingdom Region: Northeast US Irises
Region: United States of America
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irisarian
Oct 18, 2016 6:54 AM CST
We use a pine needle mulch for new plants. Remove it in the spring. We also do the rock bit.

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