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Name: Sheryl
Hot, hot, hot, Feenix, AZ (Zone 9b)
Charter ATP Member Region: Southwest Gardening Keeps Horses Dog Lover Cat Lover Permaculture
Butterflies Birds Cottage Gardener Herbs I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Irises
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sheryl
Nov 14, 2011 12:25 PM CST
Hi - does anyone have any luck with propagating Hoyas? Or are the ways to do it as diverse as the types of Hoyas? Any info or experiences are welcome.

TIA!

Sheryl
In the end, only kindness matters.

Science is not the answer, it is the question.


Name: Carolyn Madden
Pennsylvania
Charter ATP Member The WITWIT Badge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Dog Lover Plant and/or Seed Trader Daylilies
Bulbs Purslane Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Hummingbirder Clematis Cat Lover
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Carolyn22
Dec 18, 2011 8:44 AM CST
Sheryl

I see this is an old posting - however, I have taken hoya cuttings and then put them into a soiless mix of perlite, vermiculite and a bit of seed starting mix. I try to keep this from drying out. The cuttings are generally slow to start. Oh, one other thing - I do keep these cuttings under lights when starting.

Not sure if different methods are required for different hoyas. I did this with H. Kentiana (sp?)
Name: Sheryl
Hot, hot, hot, Feenix, AZ (Zone 9b)
Charter ATP Member Region: Southwest Gardening Keeps Horses Dog Lover Cat Lover Permaculture
Butterflies Birds Cottage Gardener Herbs I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Irises
Image
sheryl
Dec 18, 2011 8:00 PM CST
Oh great - that is one of the three types I have.

Did you use heat at all?

Thanks for the answer, Carolyn!
In the end, only kindness matters.

Science is not the answer, it is the question.


Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 2
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pod
Dec 18, 2011 11:04 PM CST
I had good success ( the first time I tried ) in winter rooting an assortment of Hoyas.

I used a peat based potting soil from Sunshine and of course kept it constantly damp.

I used shallow pots for Hoya cuttings and placed them on trays. The trays were set on my gas range where the pilots provided constant warmth.

The only time they had lighting was when I was home in the morning or evening, I would turn the halogen bulbs on the range hood.

In my opinion, moisture and warmth are the two primary needs to root Hoya cuttings.

Good luck, Kristi

Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
tropicbreeze
Dec 18, 2011 11:44 PM CST
I've always had success sealing them damp in ziplock plastic bags. Every couple of days they'd get rinsed and sealed again. They were in good light, never in direct sun, and soon they'd develop lots of roots along the stems. Worked really well with a few of the different H. australis subspecies, H mac., H, lacunosa, H. pubicalyx and another NOID one. Bit slower with H. pottsii and H sussuela. Once the roots were well developed they were laid on a light potting mix in the pots and covered with plastic until the roots worked their way into the soil.
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 2
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pod
Dec 19, 2011 6:37 AM CST
Very cool! I might try that also. Nothing but the cutting in the bag?
Name: Carolyn Madden
Pennsylvania
Charter ATP Member The WITWIT Badge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Dog Lover Plant and/or Seed Trader Daylilies
Bulbs Purslane Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Hummingbirder Clematis Cat Lover
Image
Carolyn22
Dec 19, 2011 6:39 AM CST
Sheryl

I never used any heating mats or anything special to generate heat to start my hoya cuttings, however, in my little plastic greenhouse it does get warm in there from the lights.

Carolyn
Name: Sheryl
Hot, hot, hot, Feenix, AZ (Zone 9b)
Charter ATP Member Region: Southwest Gardening Keeps Horses Dog Lover Cat Lover Permaculture
Butterflies Birds Cottage Gardener Herbs I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Irises
Image
sheryl
Dec 19, 2011 9:06 AM CST
Zig, I tried the baggie trick with H. lacunosa. I didn't have any success, but I think I probably used semi-dead cuttings (from the looks of my plant right now, lol) so that undoubtedly did not help.

I'm also betting that you did it in a warmer environment that what I have going right now - I have an old dog that learned a new trick of opening the kitchen door, so we've come home to some very cool kitchen temps, grrr....
In the end, only kindness matters.

Science is not the answer, it is the question.



Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
tropicbreeze
Dec 19, 2011 3:22 PM CST
Pod, there's just the moisture in the bag, and rinsing it helps prevent any build up of fungus.Apart from a bit of condensatiuon, you can see what's happening in the bag and by the time the root system develops the cutting is ready to deal with any pathogens in the soil mix.

Sheryl, sorry they didn't take for you. I have the advantage of climate. My lacunosa was posted to me so would have had a few days moistened in the plastic bag. I washed it, put it in a new bag and the root system appeared quite quickly. The best was the NOID I got from my father. I was travelling for a week before getting it home, but luckily through the tropics. I just made sure it got its rinse and plenty of daylight. The roots developed so fast it looked like a bag of spagetti with leaves in it. There were a lot of cuttings in the bag though. As Pod said earlier, moisture and temperature are the main requirements.
Name: Sheryl
Hot, hot, hot, Feenix, AZ (Zone 9b)
Charter ATP Member Region: Southwest Gardening Keeps Horses Dog Lover Cat Lover Permaculture
Butterflies Birds Cottage Gardener Herbs I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Irises
Image
sheryl
Dec 19, 2011 7:09 PM CST
Yep, I bet that temp was the problem. As soon as I get this thing growing again, I'll give it another shot.

I will never put my hoyas outside again. I will never put my hoyas outside again. I will never put....
In the end, only kindness matters.

Science is not the answer, it is the question.


Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 2
Image
pod
Dec 19, 2011 8:26 PM CST
sheryl said: I'm also betting that you did it in a warmer environment that what I have going right now - I have an old dog that learned a new trick of opening the kitchen door, so we've come home to some very cool kitchen temps, grrr....


Sitting here thinking it wouldn't matter about putting the Hoyas outdoors with a clever old dog like that ~ lol
Name: Sheryl
Hot, hot, hot, Feenix, AZ (Zone 9b)
Charter ATP Member Region: Southwest Gardening Keeps Horses Dog Lover Cat Lover Permaculture
Butterflies Birds Cottage Gardener Herbs I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Irises
Image
sheryl
Dec 21, 2011 8:17 AM CST
True dat! He can be a stitch sometimes.... and a Real PITA others.
In the end, only kindness matters.

Science is not the answer, it is the question.


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