Seeds forum: A useful germination/culture guide

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Name: Emily
Mid-Cape Cod, MA. zone 7a
Charter ATP Member
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CapeCodGardener
Feb 23, 2010 3:45 PM CST
Just wanted to say that I received my newest Park Seed print catalog, and on page 66-67 is a VERY useful , highly detailed guide to starting seeds indoors, indexed by seed name and class. The Bloom Time, Germination Time, and Culture for starting seeds are all listed for what looks like almost 200 seeds, with highly detailed info--just perfect for us seed-starting nerds!! Smiling
If you don't have the print catalog, you can see this two-page spread on-line at:
http://www.parkseed.com/gardening/GP/listpage/ecatalog

Just go to the Big Seed catalog 2010, click on it and follow along to page 66-67. I find it is very helpful to click on Full Screen and enlarge it further so my, ahem, mature eyes can read it.

Maybe people have already seen this--but I was excited to find it!
(I'm going to post this on the WS forum too, because the index gives a detailed breakdown of seeds that require stratification, chilling, or are genetically programmed to handle winter sowing well.)
Name: Karen
Cincinnati, Oh (Zone 6a)
Forum moderator I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Cut Flowers Winter Sowing Charter ATP Member Seed Starter
Echinacea Plant and/or Seed Trader Region: Ohio Region: United States of America Butterflies Hummingbirder
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kqcrna
Feb 23, 2010 3:54 PM CST

Moderator

Yes, Emily, that is a nice reference. I don't pay much attention to those little details for wintersowing because I can't control Mother Nature and what she does. But for indoors, it's very good.

Karen
Name: Tom
Chicago, near the lake
roseprose
Feb 26, 2010 2:47 PM CST
Yes, that's a useful and quick guide! I also love the germination info in Stokes Seeds catalog. It gives both indoor and outdoor planting times as well as temperatures and days to germination for gardeners in zones 4 through 6 or so (cooler zones) and all kinds of little tricks. It's as much my planting bible as Clothiers Walk and Talk and Deno's books. It's not on line but a free catalog will be sent if one goes to Stokeseeds.com or calls 1-800-396-9238. Smiling
roseprose
Name: Emily
Mid-Cape Cod, MA. zone 7a
Charter ATP Member
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CapeCodGardener
Feb 26, 2010 4:40 PM CST
Thank you, Tom, for the good suggestion of the Stokes Seeds catalog. I have ordered one for myself! Couldn't believe that I didn't already have one, since I receive scores of catalogs due to extensive roving through and ordering from seed catalogs. But I didn't, so I'm glad to be on the track of what sounds like a good reference tool.
Karen, you are so right! The good thing about WS is that one doesn't have to be in charge--Mother Nature, it's all in your capable hands! I liked the Park Seed chart because it gave me hints about which seeds are especially suitable for the WS method and why. But this isn't rocket science--there are plenty of lists available-- and I do admit that the chart was a bit trying on the eyes ! ;-)
Name: Karen
Cincinnati, Oh (Zone 6a)
Forum moderator I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Cut Flowers Winter Sowing Charter ATP Member Seed Starter
Echinacea Plant and/or Seed Trader Region: Ohio Region: United States of America Butterflies Hummingbirder
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kqcrna
Mar 7, 2010 4:27 PM CST

Moderator

T&M has a nice chart/planting guide like that, too. I forgot I had it but unearthed it today as I dug through my seed box.

Karen
Name: Gloria Gerritz
Floyd, VA
Elfie4ever
Jun 9, 2010 11:26 AM CST
I started out gardening 30+ years ago and religiously used the Park's Seed germination chart. Then I found others and forgot about it. However, it is wonderful and I will now use it again.

Winter sowing makes things easier; but last year we had snow on the ground for 90 days right through the putting out for cold treatment. This
spring and summer I am using lights to start my perennials for next year.

I am just nuts about seeds.
Name: barb allison
Fate, Texas (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Seller of Garden Stuff Region: Texas Sempervivums
mamajack
Jul 22, 2010 1:34 AM CST
i'm here to learn. but if yall are talking about seeds somewhere else tell me where to go.
Name: Karen
Cincinnati, Oh (Zone 6a)
Forum moderator I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Cut Flowers Winter Sowing Charter ATP Member Seed Starter
Echinacea Plant and/or Seed Trader Region: Ohio Region: United States of America Butterflies Hummingbirder
Image
kqcrna
Jul 22, 2010 1:37 PM CST

Moderator

What is it you're interested in, mamajack? Direct sowing, wintersowing, growing under lights?

Karen
Name: barb allison
Fate, Texas (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Seller of Garden Stuff Region: Texas Sempervivums
mamajack
Jul 22, 2010 10:09 PM CST
i am interested in wintersowing and sowing seeds outside here in pots this summer. i am new to seeds and have mixed success. so anything i can learn is what i want to know. Smiling
Name: Karen
Cincinnati, Oh (Zone 6a)
Forum moderator I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Cut Flowers Winter Sowing Charter ATP Member Seed Starter
Echinacea Plant and/or Seed Trader Region: Ohio Region: United States of America Butterflies Hummingbirder
Image
kqcrna
Jul 23, 2010 4:43 AM CST

Moderator

Have you found our wintersowing forum?
http://cubits.org/Germination/forums/view/wintersowing/

None of the garden forums are as busy now as in winter; gardeners are out gardening I guess.

Also, for the most comprehensive "how to", don't miss Trudi Davidoff's site
http://wintersown.org/
If you start at the FAQs, you'll have a good idea of what it is and what we do
http://www.wintersown.org/wseo1/How_to_Winter_Sow.html

I've been wintersowing for 5 years and I think milk jugs absolutely make the best containers. You could start to collect them now. Also stock up of potting soil by fall. It's harder to get in winter, though probably easier for you in Texas than me in Ohio.

Karen

Thumb of 2010-07-23/kqcrna/0dce20
Name: barb allison
Fate, Texas (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Seller of Garden Stuff Region: Texas Sempervivums
mamajack
Jul 23, 2010 11:29 AM CST
i am interested in seeing success rates on seed varieties that were wintersown. sometimes i don't know which seeds to winter sow.

also..........who is the best source to talk to me about depth of planting. and also what kind of dirt is best to sow seeds in?

and is my sowing in pots outside in the texas heat thru the summer..........equivalent to someone sowing seeds under grow lights? does that make sense? i have a hard time deciding in the spring WHEN to sow outside. so i decided i would try sowing seeds thru the summer here. i have had good luck with hollyhocks.
Name: Karen
Cincinnati, Oh (Zone 6a)
Forum moderator I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Cut Flowers Winter Sowing Charter ATP Member Seed Starter
Echinacea Plant and/or Seed Trader Region: Ohio Region: United States of America Butterflies Hummingbirder
Image
kqcrna
Jul 23, 2010 12:50 PM CST

Moderator

I can't help much with success rates. I'm not that scientific or particular. I grab seeds, sprinkle them in a jug, and move on. I never count seeds or figure the % that sprouted. But I am rarely disappointed; I usually end up with more plants than I can handle and end up giving a lot away to friends. I know that some people do track percentage but I never have. Seems a waste of time for me.

I have to admit I'm not too particular about planting depth, either. If you google "seed planting depth" or something similar you'll find some recommendations. Trudi addresses this in her site, too.
http://www.wintersown.org/wseo1/Sowing_Depth.html
Some sites say that if seeds need light to germinate they should be surface sown, those that need darkness should be sown deeper. Trudi has an answer to that, too. "For every day, there is also a night".

I assume you intend to cover the pots you sow in during summer? (Covering increases humidity which increases germination). If so, I'd give 'em lots of vents and keep in dappled shade. In your climate they might cook in sun. Seems in might be easier and even work better in winter to avoid the heat stress in Texas. But I probably shouldn't guess about your climate because I garden in Ohio. (Feels like Texas now, 90° with heat index 99) Thumbs down And there's a thread on the wintersowing forum about summer sowing
http://cubits.org/Germination/thread/view/27147/

There is a thread in the seed cubit about potting mixes
http://cubits.org/Germination/forums/view/soilmix/
I prefer a quality potting mix. I don't like germinating soils because I find them too fine and I think they compress too easily. Some of my favorite brands are Promix, Fafard, and MetroMix. Most wintersowers I know use Miracle Grow. I use potting mix (not seed starting mix) for everything. Everyone has their favorites, though. I also usually sprinkle fine grade horticultural vermiculite over the surface. Why don't you want to sow the seeds in winter?

If you click around the seed cubit I think you'll find a lot of the info you're looking for

Karen

Name: barb allison
Fate, Texas (Zone 8a)
Charter ATP Member Seller of Garden Stuff Region: Texas Sempervivums
mamajack
Jul 23, 2010 3:24 PM CST
i will sow in the winter. but some seeds like say morning glories you can't sow till spring.

i have awful luck direct sowing. prob. because i don't prepare my soil properly.

i'll check out those links.

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