Roses forum: Wild roses

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Name: Mary Voss
Marshfield, Missouri (Zone 6a)
Birds Butterflies Roses Irises Plant and/or Seed Trader
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MaryinLa
Apr 28, 2012 1:19 PM CST
I am so glad to find this forum. I was a DG member for years. And I love sharing rose info.

In my yard I have a wild rose growing. It is a single white, 5 petals, very small flower, about 1/2" to 5/8" diameter. Photo attached. I don't know yet if it reblooms or not. I would guess no.

There is also a wild rose that grows in the area here, it is also a single but light pink, flowers are a bit larger than the white ones, about 1" diameter or slightly larger. It grows like a climber, and seems to be very vigorous. Is non-remontant.

The picture attached shows the whole shrub that is on a fence line in my neighborhood. It has grown up a fence line, nobody is cultivating that area, so I am sure it is wild.

The ruler picture shows the pink ones.

Anybody have any idea of species?




Thumb of 2012-04-28/MaryinLa/9a42b3

Thumb of 2012-04-28/MaryinLa/f2e10c

Thumb of 2012-04-28/MaryinLa/3f1c5a
[Last edited by MaryinLa - Apr 28, 2012 1:22 PM (+)]
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Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Apr 28, 2012 2:36 PM CST
Pretty little things! I have no idea what they are though.
Porkpal
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses
Clematis Irises Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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zuzu
Apr 28, 2012 4:28 PM CST

Moderator

I'm not really up on wild roses. Kathleen grows some and is more likely to know their names.

To me, they look like different varieties of Multiflora.

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&tok=kmhqAhefLimlvNif_Az0...
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses
Clematis Irises Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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zuzu
Apr 28, 2012 4:35 PM CST

Moderator

I just noticed that the leaves on yours have a serrated edge, which is not typical of native Multiflora roses.

I'm stumped.
Name: Mary Voss
Marshfield, Missouri (Zone 6a)
Birds Butterflies Roses Irises Plant and/or Seed Trader
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MaryinLa
Apr 29, 2012 10:37 AM CST
I have cut some of the pink one to root it, hopefully it will take. 
Name: Mary Voss
Marshfield, Missouri (Zone 6a)
Birds Butterflies Roses Irises Plant and/or Seed Trader
Image
MaryinLa
Apr 29, 2012 5:16 PM CST
This is a closer pic of the leaves from the small white one.
Thumb of 2012-04-29/MaryinLa/6173bb
Name: Mary Voss
Marshfield, Missouri (Zone 6a)
Birds Butterflies Roses Irises Plant and/or Seed Trader
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MaryinLa
May 3, 2012 10:34 AM CST
I had sent an email to the state conservation people, and got this answer back about the white flowered one.

"The rose with the white bloom is called “Multi-flora Rose”. It is a severe invader problem in Missouri. It invades pastures and spreads easily by the seed by birds and other animals. It is listed as a Noxious Weed in Missouri (see http://mda.mo.gov/plants/pdf/noxiousweeds.pdf ).
I would suggest not planting or spreading this plant. In fact, it should be killed by spraying. If you cut it off, you will need to treat the stumps with a weed killer or it will sprout back with more stems. "
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
May 3, 2012 11:27 AM CST
Ah, yes - we have those invading our pastures here too. You really don't want them. Many years Macartney rose ( not to be confused with The McCartney Rose) was sold as an impenetrable hedge to contain livestock; actually it just crowds the cows out of their pastures!
Porkpal
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses
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Steve812
May 3, 2012 2:35 PM CST
So often the story in agriculture is 'be careful what you wish for..' Corn that resists glysophate seems to breed weeds that do, too...

When I gardened in NJ long ago, a multiflora volunteer was climbing a maple tree and it was the only rose in bloom. For a very brief moment I considered it one of the best roses in the garden. It was certainly the one that required the least care. And I was fond of its great panicles of flowers. I even found some subtle beauty in the golden stamens within the flower. I think the color scheme found its way into RoseFile. I think if it had been as fragrant as the musk rose, I would have been delighted with it.

If you are worried that it will crowd the cows out of your yard, I think you should get rid of it post-haste. But if you like it, definitely give it another year.
Name: Toni
Denver Metro (Zone 5a)
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.
Charter ATP Member Irises Salvias Xeriscape Birds I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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Skiekitty
May 3, 2012 3:21 PM CST
Clunking the cows on the head, chopping them up, & putting them on the BBQ / smoker also solves the problem of cows invading your property... Whistling Whistling Whistling Whistling
Roses are one of my passions! Just opened, my Etsy shop (to fund my rose hobby)! http://www.etsy.com/shop/TweetsnTreats
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses
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zuzu
May 3, 2012 4:07 PM CST

Moderator

I think it's best to get rid of R. multiflora wherever possible. Even if its invasive habit doesn't create problems, it's highly susceptible to rose rosette disease, which will spread to other roses.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
May 3, 2012 4:08 PM CST
No no, the rose is invasive; the cows live here.
Porkpal
Name: Toni
Denver Metro (Zone 5a)
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.
Charter ATP Member Irises Salvias Xeriscape Birds I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Procrastinator The WITWIT Badge Region: Colorado Enjoys or suffers cold winters Cat Lover
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Skiekitty
May 3, 2012 4:13 PM CST
Yea, but cows on the grill taste better than roses do!! Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing Rolling on the floor laughing
Roses are one of my passions! Just opened, my Etsy shop (to fund my rose hobby)! http://www.etsy.com/shop/TweetsnTreats
Name: Mary Voss
Marshfield, Missouri (Zone 6a)
Birds Butterflies Roses Irises Plant and/or Seed Trader
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MaryinLa
May 3, 2012 5:02 PM CST
LOL, you guys are too funny.

It is pretty, kinda reminds me of the midwest version of Cherokee rose, albeit much smaller blooms. I used to love the spring in Louisiana when the Cherokee roses would bloom.

I am going to remove it from the garden, I would rather not deal with the problems it might create.

Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses
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Steve812
May 4, 2012 9:08 AM CST
Sounds like the cows win this round of cows vs. roses.

Rose rosette disease is something I have heard about but not encountered, fortunately. Most of the rose gardeners who seem to know anything about it hale from California. Many people elsewhere do not. Am I right in assuming it is spread by insects? What other factors favor its transmission? Are all roses with multiflora heritage more susceptible to it than others? Are there roses that - like typhoid Mary - harbor the disease but do not show symptoms of it? When I purchase plants at a big box store, how do I check for it: is it even possible if the plant is not leafed out?
Name: Toni
Denver Metro (Zone 5a)
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.
Charter ATP Member Irises Salvias Xeriscape Birds I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Procrastinator The WITWIT Badge Region: Colorado Enjoys or suffers cold winters Cat Lover
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Skiekitty
May 4, 2012 9:28 AM CST
Steve - from what I winnowed through on reading up about this, looks like it can be spread via mites. It's a virus and it's horribly contagious, to the point of burning the field to rid of it any part of this. Yikes! I hope I never have to see this..

"A virus once again "fits" because virus particles are not limited to phloem and may be readily available within a range of plant tissue to hitch-hike on eriophyid mites. "

From this site: http://bygl.osu.edu/content/twisted-story-rose-rosette-disea...
Roses are one of my passions! Just opened, my Etsy shop (to fund my rose hobby)! http://www.etsy.com/shop/TweetsnTreats
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses
Image
Steve812
May 4, 2012 11:20 AM CST
OK.

Virginia Cooperative Extension Service - a good source of photos of the symptoms.
- ditto, with a brief list of controls

and so on...

Just about any rose cultivar can harbor the disease. There are online references showing Gloire de Dijon with the disease and Knockout with it. There are online stories of major parts of rose gardens knocked out by the disease. There is no known cure for the disease and only recently has its cause been positively identified as being viral in nature. I understand that rosa multiflora is considered a reservoir for the disease in the wild. It is one wild rose that does not resist the disease. And there are bajillions of multiflora roses in the wild. Furthermore, there is a suggestion at the ARS rose site that some of these wild multiflora roses were purposefully infected in order to kill the multiflora roses, now considered in many states to be noxious weeds. I understand R. setigera, by contrast, does seem to repel the mites that spread the disease.

What I do not understand is why an uninfected multiflora rose is any more danger to a garden than, say, and uninfected Gloire de Dijon or Knockout rose. The reason that, say, Gloire de Dijon is not a reservoir for the disease in the wilds of Nebraska, Pennsylvania, or Iowa is that it could not survive for one year in the wild. R. multiflora, by contrast can. And it can survive for six or seven years infected with the disease. There are essentially no Gloire de Dijon roses in the wild to serve as reservoirs. This does not mean that Gloire de Dijon is any less of a danger as a host plant to rose rosette disease within a southern garden than is R. multiflora. The reason multiflora is a reservoir is that there are lots of them. And perhaps some of them have been purposefully infected.

I guess cows have a whole different set of pathologies.
Name: Toni
Denver Metro (Zone 5a)
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot.
Charter ATP Member Irises Salvias Xeriscape Birds I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Procrastinator The WITWIT Badge Region: Colorado Enjoys or suffers cold winters Cat Lover
Image
Skiekitty
May 4, 2012 11:32 AM CST
Mad Rose disease? Whistling Whistling Whistling
Roses are one of my passions! Just opened, my Etsy shop (to fund my rose hobby)! http://www.etsy.com/shop/TweetsnTreats
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
May 4, 2012 9:02 PM CST
I have never seen rose rosette in any of the wild multiflora roses here in Texas or in South Carolina where we use to farm and the rose thrived. Perhaps it is a somewhat regional disease. (?)
Porkpal
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses
Image
Steve812
May 4, 2012 10:24 PM CST
I noticed when I was doing research online today that one of the documents featured a headline like "Rose Rosette Disease found in private gardens in NJ's Somerset County" That is where I used to live. I am saddened to think that the roses I established there are at risk. It seems to me that once one is living in places where multifloras were not planted for soil stabilization, perhaps the problem cannot be not so bad. Evidently in parts of NJ, PA, OH, VA, and bits of the Midwest it can be a serious problem. I'm hoping that it won't be a problem here since we are so far from natural reservoirs of the disease. But I guess anything could happen. I'll continue cultivating other fragrant plants.

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