Southwest Gardening forum: Your forum...

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Name: Alan
Chandler, AZ; 85225 (Zone 9b)
Sunset Zone 13
Charter ATP Member Region: Southwest Gardening Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Cottage Gardener I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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GardenGuyAZ
Jun 2, 2010 3:34 PM CST
This is your forum Rose Lovers, and those who want to learn more about roses. Please feel free to post at will. Ask questions, give answers. This is our forum, not my forum. Also show us pictures of your roses that you love. Tell us why you love them. I look forward to hearing from everyone with your passionate about roses, or just curious!

Alan

























Name: Alma
Phoenix & Cottonwood, AZ
USDA zone 9b, Sunset 13 & ??
Image
tomatofreak
Jun 2, 2010 6:53 PM CST
Perfect timing for this forum. I planted a 'climbing' rose a few years ago. (I can't remember the name.) It became a complete monster and had the most lethal thorns I think I've ever encountered. It grabbed everyone who walked by. Anyhow, it got to the point where I couldn't tell a sucker from a cane and I chopped it to the ground a month or two ago. It's coming back - and each day getting taller. How can I tame this thing? Is it possible to keep it trimmed to shrub height and still have it bloom? I'll try to post a photo later.
Alma
In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. – Thomas Jefferson
Name: Alan
Chandler, AZ; 85225 (Zone 9b)
Sunset Zone 13
Charter ATP Member Region: Southwest Gardening Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Cottage Gardener I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Plumerias Plant and/or Seed Trader Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Butterflies Bulbs Container Gardener
GardenGuyAZ
Jun 2, 2010 7:02 PM CST
Alma,

It would help to know what climber it is to answer your question. If you don't like the rose, why not just dig out out, dump it, and get a rose more to your liking. Generally if you soak the ground real well, it doesn't take much to dig the rose out by it's roots so it never comes back. Then plant a nice shrub rose there, or a hybrid tea rose. Floribunda roses tend to make nice shrub roses.

Alan

























Name: Judy
Phoenix, AZ
judyb
Jun 2, 2010 7:02 PM CST
Depends on whether it's a true climber or a climbing hybrid tea or floribunda. Cl. HTs bloom on apical buds. In other words they grow on what they perceive as the top of the rose. You can 'tame' them by tying the canes out rather than up. You will still get bloom that way. It it's a climber it may only bloom on old wood so if you kept it pruned too hard - no flowers. It sounds as if yours is the climber type that will likely only bloom when it has formed sufficient foliage to support the bloom. I say remove the thing entirely and get something nice. Get a rose like Zephirine Drouhin that has no thorns and still makes lovely fragrant blooms. There are other thornless varieties. Get one!
Name: Alan
Chandler, AZ; 85225 (Zone 9b)
Sunset Zone 13
Charter ATP Member Region: Southwest Gardening Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Cottage Gardener I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Plumerias Plant and/or Seed Trader Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Butterflies Bulbs Container Gardener
GardenGuyAZ
Jun 2, 2010 7:08 PM CST
Judy, you are on cubits! Yeah!! Judy is just as much a pro on roses as I am, and it helps to have two opinions, even when they are the same :)

Alan

























Name: Alan
Chandler, AZ; 85225 (Zone 9b)
Sunset Zone 13
Charter ATP Member Region: Southwest Gardening Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Cottage Gardener I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Plumerias Plant and/or Seed Trader Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Butterflies Bulbs Container Gardener
GardenGuyAZ
Jun 2, 2010 7:13 PM CST
Definition of Apical Bud/Terminal bud: It is the dominant bud, since it can cause all the Axillary (lateral) buds below them to remain dormant. Terminal buds have special tissue, called apical meristem, cells that can divide indefinitely and produces all the differentiated tissue, including vegetative and reproductive organs.
The terminal bud is the main area of growth in most plants. Its own growth exhibits apical dominance, inhibiting the growth of axillary buds. Around the terminal bud is a complex arrangement of nodes and internodes with maturing leaves.

























Name: Alan
Chandler, AZ; 85225 (Zone 9b)
Sunset Zone 13
Charter ATP Member Region: Southwest Gardening Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Cottage Gardener I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Plumerias Plant and/or Seed Trader Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Butterflies Bulbs Container Gardener
GardenGuyAZ
Jun 2, 2010 7:14 PM CST
Definition of Apical Bud/Terminal bud: It is the dominant bud, since it can cause all the Axillary (lateral) buds below them to remain dormant. Terminal buds have special tissue, called apical meristem, cells that can divide indefinitely and produces all the differentiated tissue, including vegetative and reproductive organs.
The terminal bud is the main area of growth in most plants. Its own growth exhibits apical dominance, inhibiting the growth of axillary buds. Around the terminal bud is a complex arrangement of nodes and internodes with maturing leaves.

Hope this helps :)

Thumb of 2010-06-03/GardenGuyAZ/404ac7

























Name: Judy
Phoenix, AZ
judyb
Jun 2, 2010 7:29 PM CST
Great layout of different bud growth, Alan. You're way ahead of me in rose lore.

PS: I've been on Cubits for many months but not much has been happening until this shake-up, about which least said, soonest mended.
Name: Susie
Phoenix AZ (Zone 9a)
Southwest Gardening~ moderator/ATP.
Charter ATP Member Tip Photographer Forum moderator Region: Southwest Gardening Garden Ideas: Level 2 Roses
Birds Region: United States of America Garden Art Dog Lover Daylilies Hummingbirder
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Aguane
Jun 2, 2010 8:37 PM CST
Yea! Alan! Glad you're here! Enjoy!
“Don't give up too quickly"... unknown, I heard it somewhere.
~ All Things Plants, SOUTHWEST GARDENING ~Cubits.org ENERGY & POWER
Name: ~~Brittany~~
Phoenix, Az (Zone 9b)
Charter ATP Member Orchids Daylilies Tropicals Roses Region: Southwest Gardening
Plumerias Irises Hummingbirder Garden Art Dog Lover Container Gardener
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FrangipaniAz
Jun 3, 2010 12:35 AM CST
Is this a good time to dead head?? They look so sad because I wasn't able to trim them back, you know, with a baby an everything :)
Gardens... should be like lovely, well-shaped girls: all curves, secret corners, unexpected deviations, seductive surprises and then still more curves. ~H.E. Bates, A Love of Flowers
Name: Alan
Chandler, AZ; 85225 (Zone 9b)
Sunset Zone 13
Charter ATP Member Region: Southwest Gardening Organic Gardener Native Plants and Wildflowers Cottage Gardener I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Plumerias Plant and/or Seed Trader Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Butterflies Bulbs Container Gardener
GardenGuyAZ
Jun 3, 2010 5:13 AM CST
Yes, you can dead head anytime they need dead headed. Just no heavy pruning right now. You don't want to expose bare canes to that hot sun. It's important to keep all the leaves that you can. But yes, you can remove spent blooms (dead heading ) any time.

Alan

























Name: Judy
Phoenix, AZ
judyb
Jun 3, 2010 11:50 AM CST
I like roses that dead head themselves although they do leave that unattractive stem but at least you don't have to remove spent flowers. I'm all for less work. :-)

Alan, one time I had the bright idea of pruning in the summer to take advantage of the semi-dormant stage caused by the heat. It was hotter'n h...um, all get out, while I was doing it. The roses didn't seem to mind and I got a crop of long-stemmed beauties in the fall. All-in-all it wasn't worth the heat and effort as the roses would have started blooming nicely anyway. So, anyone tempted to prune in the summer, don't bother. Just keep the spent flowers off and give lots of water.
Name: Susie
Phoenix AZ (Zone 9a)
Southwest Gardening~ moderator/ATP.
Charter ATP Member Tip Photographer Forum moderator Region: Southwest Gardening Garden Ideas: Level 2 Roses
Birds Region: United States of America Garden Art Dog Lover Daylilies Hummingbirder
Image
Aguane
Jun 3, 2010 9:51 PM CST
I agree Judy. That's what I do with my few roses. I talked to Summer Winds on Tatum and they advised same.
“Don't give up too quickly"... unknown, I heard it somewhere.
~ All Things Plants, SOUTHWEST GARDENING ~Cubits.org ENERGY & POWER
Name: Alma
Phoenix & Cottonwood, AZ
USDA zone 9b, Sunset 13 & ??
Image
tomatofreak
Jun 12, 2010 7:37 PM CST
I found the climbing monster; it's this one: http://www.growquest.com/climbing%20spice_so_nice.htm

I planted this rose over a stray cat that was tragically killed in a neighbor's yard. He was an orange cat so I picked an orange rose. I don't want to dig it up; I just want to manage the thing. Whether it's the right time (and I know it's not), I keep cutting it back to shrub size. I'll see what happens. I'd love for it to bloom.
Alma
In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. – Thomas Jefferson

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