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South San Francisco Bay Area (Zone 9b)
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Polymerous
May 23, 2014 2:19 AM CST
I apologize for the quality of the photography (leaf tip obscuring the bloom, brown leaves). This was the only image that I have of 'Sparkling Opal', and I no longer have the plant. Since there was no image in the ATP database, I decided that something was better than nothing and that I should put this in. (Insofar as the bloom itself, it did look like it does in the image.)
The current avatar image is that of a volunteer daylily seedling showing cristation.
Name: Suzanne/Sue
Sebastopol, CA (Zone 9a)
Sunset Zone 15
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Calif_Sue
May 23, 2014 9:37 PM CST

Plants Admin

I really am unclear as to why you are thinking you need to apologize for this gorgeous shot! Since when does a garden bloom present itself in perfect 'fashion model' look? Not in my garden! You get what is presented, brown leaves, bug chewed holes, etc. And that is what belongs in the database, realistic blooms!
Please do not hesitate to add any of your lovely images to the database!!
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Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
May 24, 2014 12:23 AM CST
I agree
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Karen Mcilroy
Puyallup,Wa. (Zone 8b)
Daylilies Keeper of Poultry Region: Pacific Northwest Birds Frogs and Toads
kkaymci55
May 24, 2014 4:39 PM CST
Polymerous said:I apologize for the quality of the photography (leaf tip obscuring the bloom, brown leaves). This was the only image that I have of 'Sparkling Opal', and I no longer have the plant. Since there was no image in the ATP database, I decided that something was better than nothing and that I should put this in. (Insofar as the bloom itself, it did look like it does in the image.)


We would rather have that picture than one that has been so doctored up that it in no way resembles the real thing. Anymore I try to look at 5 or more pictures from places like Allthingsplants to decide if it really is something I want to buy. Karen M.
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
May 24, 2014 6:30 PM CST
Karen ...

I truly agree. I hate doctored photos.

I also wish we had more full plant photos. That would be a big help.

Smiles,
Lyn
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
South San Francisco Bay Area (Zone 9b)
"The mountains are calling..."
Region: California Garden Photography Garden Procrastinator Daylilies Pollen collector Dog Lover
Moon Gardener Irises Heucheras Vegetable Grower Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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Polymerous
May 25, 2014 2:59 PM CST
Thank you all for your kind comments. I really hate it, though, when leaves droop over the bloom... or you have an otherwise nice photo of a bloom, but then discover brown leaves or weeds underfoot when you go to crop or otherwise massage the image.

I am probably going to open a can of worms here, but here is my opinion on photo editing...

While I am in agreement that images should not be doctored to make the flower appear better (or a different color) than it is in real life (I have purchased any number of daylilies based on their hybridizer images and have been majorly disappointed), sometimes some judicial photo editing is called for to produce an acceptable image. Yes, I confess that I am guilty of "doctoring" images at times. Usually images need cropping. Other editing is done mostly to "touch up" remove little specks of dirt or pollen, or to sharpen the image, or to lighten/darken the overall image or fix the contrast. (I have learned for the most part to NOT to take full sun daylily pictures (the images rarely look good) but while the bloom color (imho) is more true when captured in the shade, the overall image may be dark enough that it requires lightening.) Though sometimes, for whatever reason, the bloom color is not captured correctly, and then color "doctoring" becomes a necessity. As an example, I have a lavender seedling which is always digitally captured as a rose or rose purple; to make that image appear closer to its true color, I pretty much have to enhance the blue.

Fwiw, the only thing that was done to the submitted 'Sparkling Opal' image was to blend out one dirt spot, and do a "quick fix" enhance (which sharpened the image and lightened it). In my opinion, there was no reason to leave the dirt spot there, and the quick fix one step enhance brought the flower closer to its true shade (as I recall it). However, if you wish to see the original image (and compare it to the image that I submitted):

'Sparkling Opal', unedited image 'Sparkling Opal' image submitted to the database
Thumb of 2014-05-25/Polymerous/a40813

Re the plant itself... I had 'Sparkling Opal' many years ago and got rid of it when I started moving towards more tetraploids. I really loved the large, fragrant, diamond dusted flowers... but the plant was not well branched and the flowers were on quite short scapes (for the flower size) and best enjoyed in a very raised bed (as in, a 22" bed). Now I am somewhat having second thoughts about this plant... but sadly, I was unable to find a source with a quick online search. (Consider that a caution about being too quick to delete a daylily, just to make room for something newer and arguably fancier.)

(I do, however, have a grand-daughter plant which is somewhat polymerous. I have kept it lo these many years partly out of sentiment as an early "success" (even though it is only 60% poly or so), but largely because the huge yellow poly blooms of the seedling really cheer me up. Like its grandmother, though, the large flowers are on relatively short scapes, so the seedling is also kept in a raised bed for my close-up viewing enjoyment. I have recently had second thoughts about restricting my poly pollen-dabbing to tets only, so I plan on working with that seedling again, and hope to get something nice from it (maybe not yellow) down the road. One of my goals (apart from preserving or increasing the poly trait) will be to get the scape height up!)

Grand-daughter of 'Sparkling Opal'

Thumb of 2014-05-25/Polymerous/c9ad77

edited as I forgot to mention cropping... which can be quite important to bring focus onto individual blooms or otherwise present a pleasing picture
The current avatar image is that of a volunteer daylily seedling showing cristation.
[Last edited by Polymerous - May 25, 2014 3:05 PM (+)]
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Name: Suzanne/Sue
Sebastopol, CA (Zone 9a)
Sunset Zone 15
Region: California Plant Database Moderator Roses Irises Clematis Garden Photography
Cottage Gardener Keeper of Poultry Hummingbirder Bee Lover Butterflies Birds
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Calif_Sue
May 25, 2014 3:35 PM CST

Plants Admin

I usually do all the editing functions you mentioned above, most of the time it only needs very minor tweaking. Anyone who takes lots of digital photographs knows this is also a necessity to do some editing to achieve a good representation of a plant or bloom.
My gardening Blog!
Hand sewn wares and vintage finds in my Etsy store. Summer Song Cottage
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
May 25, 2014 4:15 PM CST
I don't mind the kind of editing you are talking about. When I said I hated doctored photos, I was thinking of all of the rose photos where people blurred the leaves of the photo so much that you couldn't tell that they were covered with black spot.

Cropping makes sense simply because sometimes the photos are just too busy to really show the bloom well. I don't really care if there are some weeds in the photo. I don't know anyone who doesn't have weeds in their garden. It's a part of the gardening life.

No can of worms here.

Smiles,
Lyn
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.

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