Vegetables and Fruit forum: Collard Greens

Views: 627, Replies: 12 » Jump to the end
Name: Tom
Southern Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Irises Vegetable Grower Butterflies Region: Wisconsin Keeps Horses Cat Lover
Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Daylilies Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
tveguy3
Jul 15, 2014 12:22 PM CST
I like to try new things once in a while, and this year Collard Greens are new to me. I'm not sure when I can start eating them. Do I have to wait until frost, somewhere I read that they are better after a frost. Or can I start enjoying them now. The plants as you can see are getting quite big.
Thumb of 2014-07-15/tveguy3/5aeea1
I am not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep; I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion. - Alexander the Great
Name: Horseshoe Griffin
Efland, NC (Zone 7a)
And in the end...a happy beginning!
Charter ATP Member I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle Garden Sages I sent a postcard to Randy! I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
For our friend, Shoe. Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Enjoys or suffers cold winters Birds Permaculture Container Gardener
Image
Horseshoe
Jul 15, 2014 3:10 PM CST
I prefer them after a good frost or two on them as they'll sweeten up a bit but have friends who eat them year round. I think you should go ahead and pick some of the lower leaves on some of the plants and give 'em a try now. You can still have plenty left in the garden to try when cooler weather sets in.

VERY nice looking garden, by the way. You've been busy! Congrats!

Shoe (collard green lover, with smoked ham or ham hock or salted fat back or my favorite, smoked turkey leg in the pot~!!) Sticking tongue out
Name: Dillard Haley
Augusta Georgia (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Master Level Avid Green Pages Reviewer Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
farmerdill
Jul 15, 2014 3:18 PM CST
In your climate they are probably ok now. I don't eat collards until winter. Too many veggies available in summer that I like better. Collards are sweeter in cold weather, The sugars acts as an antifreeze. They are really good from New Year on as most everything except kale has retired for the winter. Collards to me are better tasting than kale.


Name: cheshirekat
New Mexico, USA Zone 8 (Zone 8a)
Herbs Dog Lover Bee Lover Vegetable Grower Garden Procrastinator
Image
ckatNM
Jul 15, 2014 6:12 PM CST
I love collards but haven't grown them in years.
"A garden is a friend you can visit any time." - Anonymous
Name: Tom
Southern Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Irises Vegetable Grower Butterflies Region: Wisconsin Keeps Horses Cat Lover
Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Daylilies Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
tveguy3
Jul 15, 2014 6:34 PM CST
I had a friend give me a whole flat of them, so I cut some off the little plants and cooked them and tried them. They were very good then. So I planted 10 of them. I'll have to give them a try soon then and see what they are like now. My garden was late this year. I didn't get most of it in until after the first week in June. My tomatoes are doing pretty well, still just green ones though, but growing well.
Thumb of 2014-07-16/tveguy3/d02526
I am not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep; I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion. - Alexander the Great
Name: Arlene
Grantville, GA (Zone 8a)
Greenhouse Region: Georgia Garden Sages Organic Gardener Beekeeper Vegetable Grower
Seed Starter Cut Flowers Composter Keeper of Poultry Keeps Goats Avid Green Pages Reviewer
Image
abhege
Jul 16, 2014 5:26 PM CST
Your garden looks wonderful! How'd you keep it so weed free?
Name: Dave Whitinger
Jacksonville, Texas (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Region: Texas Master Gardener: Texas Permaculture Raises cows I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Master Level Beekeeper Garden Sages Avid Green Pages Reviewer Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Image
dave
Jul 16, 2014 5:30 PM CST

Garden.org Admin

I also wonder how you keep it weed free! That soil looks exactly like the soil on my grandparents farm in Elroy, WI.
Name: Tom
Southern Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Irises Vegetable Grower Butterflies Region: Wisconsin Keeps Horses Cat Lover
Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Daylilies Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
tveguy3
Jul 16, 2014 6:17 PM CST
Haven't you heard about my famous weeding chickens??? Rolling on the floor laughing If you follow any of the threads in the Iris forum, you would have heard all the jokes about my chickens. Anyway, It's not always weed free, but I try hard. I set the rows so I can run the tiller through to keep the major areas weed free. Then I have an Action hoe that I use between the bigger plants and of course it's on my hands and knees to do the detailing. I use the plastic mulch where I can, and I re-purpose tarps that I use to cover hay for mulching larger areas. You can see that in the tomato patch. I'll post a picture of the peppers so you can get a better view of the tarp. I just cut an X in the tarp and plant. I'll also show you my plastic mulch. My neighbor does truck farming on a large scale, and he has a machine that lays this platic mulch. When the roll gets toward the end, he changes it and gives me the remaining plastic. I put it down by hand. I have amazing soil here, very sandy loam base with about 24 inches of very dark top soil. Of course I have lots of horse compost to add to it as well. Dave, your Grand parents live in Elroy? You will have to stop in if you ever come to visit them.

Now about the chickens. In one of the Iris threads a while back I stated that I prenatally train chickens to do weeding. I explained that I made an audio tape that kept repeating the training to the eggs as they were incubated. Of course it was meant to be a joke, but some guy took it seriously. Thought I'd die laughing. Now I keep getting ribbed about my weeding chickens.

Peppers and Egg Plants
Thumb of 2014-07-17/tveguy3/936d6d
Sweet potatoes.
Thumb of 2014-07-17/tveguy3/bb218f
I am not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep; I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion. - Alexander the Great
Name: Dave Whitinger
Jacksonville, Texas (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Region: Texas Master Gardener: Texas Permaculture Raises cows I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Ideas: Master Level Beekeeper Garden Sages Avid Green Pages Reviewer Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Image
dave
Jul 16, 2014 7:44 PM CST

Garden.org Admin

tveguy3 said:I have amazing soil here, very sandy loam base with about 24 inches of very dark top soil. Of course I have lots of horse compost to add to it as well. Dave, your Grand parents live in Elroy? You will have to stop in if you ever come to visit them.


I am deeply envious of the soil you have. I remember very well the beautiful rich soil up there, deposited I guess during the ice age.

(And at the risk of going off topic: the grandparents are all passed away and I don't know what became of their beautiful farm.)
[Last edited by dave - Jul 16, 2014 7:44 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #660607 (9)
Name: Tom
Southern Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Irises Vegetable Grower Butterflies Region: Wisconsin Keeps Horses Cat Lover
Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Daylilies Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
tveguy3
Jul 17, 2014 3:50 AM CST
Yes, I think my land was once a lake bed. It's very flat here, and there are lots of fossels of shell fish here. It's sad to see land being removed from the agricultural base. Just down the road there's a 50 acre field being prepared for industrial use. I don't understand why they have to take prime farm land for this. There are other places where the land is not as good that could be used for that. We just keep loosing property to cement and blacktop.

It's hard to loose the old farms. My parents farm is way up North, and not in the family any more. Hopefully your Grand parents farm is still being farmed. Farming has become big business now, most of them are big corporation farms. Very few of them are family farms any more. The few that remain are usually the Organic farms. They can still make a living.
I am not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep; I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion. - Alexander the Great
Name: Glen Ingram
Macleay Is, Qld, Australia (Zone 12a)
Bearded Dragon young male
Region: Australia Annuals Canning and food preservation Herbs Tropicals Foliage Fan
Plays in the sandbox Cactus and Succulents Garden Photography Hybridizer Composter Sedums
Image
Gleni
Aug 1, 2014 5:39 AM CST
Yes, the salad bowls go under suburbia and industralia here too. The large cities were often founded because of the fertility of the land nearby. The State's laws now protect rural land from development. But it has not been too popular with farmers. They cannot compete with imports. As well, if they cannot sell their land for anything accept farming, they have no money for old age.
Name: Gerry Donahue
Pleasant Lake, IN (Zone 5b)
Hostas Garden Ideas: Master Level
Image
profesora
Aug 2, 2014 8:55 PM CST
Tom, I do not wait at all. I have been eating collards since early July. I also blanch a lot and freeze for later use.

I have some tasty beef back ribs cooked with garlic, onions, and cilantro, that tomorrow I will add garden-fresh red potatoes, and a lot of collards.

When the leaves become too thick for my taste, I serve them to the turkeys and chickens.
Name: Tom
Southern Wisconsin (Zone 5b)
Irises Vegetable Grower Butterflies Region: Wisconsin Keeps Horses Cat Lover
Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Daylilies Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
tveguy3
Aug 3, 2014 3:52 AM CST
Mine are getting pretty big, I cooked some the other day, I picked the bottom leaves, and cooked them for a quite a long time, and they were kind of chewy, I think I should propbably pick some of the younger leaves.
I am not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep; I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion. - Alexander the Great

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Vegetables and Fruit forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by Whitebeard and is called "variegated impatiens"