Wildflowers forum: Again Seeking Suggestions

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Name: Kim
Iowa (Zone 5a)
I kill ornamentals... on purpose.
Enjoys or suffers cold winters Spiders! Critters Allowed Birds Houseplants I helped beta test the first seed swap
Region: Nebraska Keeper of Poultry Rabbit Keeper Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Procrastinator Garden Ideas: Level 2
Chillybean
Sep 9, 2015 3:17 PM CST
I had several Leadplants, most disappeared even with watching, weeding around them and mulching. I was down to two, and one of those just got mowed down. Even with my neon orange flag next to it. :(

The area gets sun except maybe a couple of hours. I would like a shrubby type plant that grows faster than Leadplant, or False Fragrant Indigo. Or a bushy forb. I do not want something that will get overly large since there is a side walk next to it, but maybe large enough to hide the compost ball. ?? I really want a native rose, but can these grow into a bush-like plant. The ones along the road are straggly.

The next quandary is a spot along the south side of the house. The thing of that is the phone line is near there somewhere, so I cannot have anything with massive roots. I'd really like a perennial, if possible, but to stay away from non-native. This spot is where I used to have the dill. Some may still pop up, but now that I have plenty of Golden Alexanders, I'll likely yank them. Prior to that were Daffodil bulbs, but a critter must've eaten them since no more come up. My husband doesn't want that spot to become a "tick zone" in the spring because it is where the hose is, so I cannot let it overgrow a lot.

I may resort to Partridge Pea. This is an annual, so likely not large roots. I thought about Blazingstar of some type, but my experience is they get tall, but I think they have corms (like bulbs), so maybe they won't be a problem underground??

I tried calling Prairie Moon asking them about these things, but they were not very helpful. The fellow mentioned the Plant Finder, but I had already gone through that.

Maybe some of you have experience with plants that may fit my situations. Thank you for any advice.

Oh, I am hopefully getting a Buttonbush, but that gets bigger than I want by the sidewalk. I will put that elsewhere in the yard.
Name: josephine
Arlington, Texas (Zone 8a)
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frostweed
Sep 10, 2015 7:32 AM CST

Moderator

I am thinking of a few plants that would be good but I don't think they are cold hardy in your zone.

How about Coralberry, http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=SYOR

If you get a Buttonbush be prepared to water it often, they like a lot of water.

I will think but with the zones being so different I may not have good suggestions.
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Name: Caroline Scott
Calgary (Zone 4a)
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CarolineScott
Sep 10, 2015 7:49 AM CST
Perhaps a sowing of a seeds mix which contains some perennial wildflowers?
Name: Kim
Iowa (Zone 5a)
I kill ornamentals... on purpose.
Enjoys or suffers cold winters Spiders! Critters Allowed Birds Houseplants I helped beta test the first seed swap
Region: Nebraska Keeper of Poultry Rabbit Keeper Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Procrastinator Garden Ideas: Level 2
Chillybean
Sep 10, 2015 9:56 AM CST
frostweed said:I am thinking of a few plants that would be good but I don't think they are cold hardy in your zone.

How about Coralberry, http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=SYOR

If you get a Buttonbush be prepared to water it often, they like a lot of water.

I will think but with the zones being so different I may not have good suggestions.


Coralberry might be interesting. I just checked, it is available locally. The berry colour is pretty and I've been looking for more ways to feed the birds.

About the Buttonbush, I emailed the owner of a native tree/shrub place asking him to hold one for me and he wrote back warning me about that. I've been doing ok this year with some wet plants and plan to put the Buttonbush near there.
Name: Kim
Iowa (Zone 5a)
I kill ornamentals... on purpose.
Enjoys or suffers cold winters Spiders! Critters Allowed Birds Houseplants I helped beta test the first seed swap
Region: Nebraska Keeper of Poultry Rabbit Keeper Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Procrastinator Garden Ideas: Level 2
Chillybean
Sep 10, 2015 10:19 AM CST
CarolineScott said:Perhaps a sowing of a seeds mix which contains some perennial wildflowers?


I am thinking about this, but so far I've got about an acre of native wildflowers and the roots get deep.
Here's an image I found that shows what the roots are like of many native flowers that were found in our state.
http://thislivelyearth.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Prairi...

I found this pretty plant that is fairly short.
http://www.prairiemoon.com/seeds/wildflowers-forbs/gentiana-...
And judging from this picture, the roots would be somewhat shallow.
http://www.friendsofthewildflowergarden.org/generaljpegs/Sea...

If I plant this, I am going to chicken wire them because too many things have gotten mowed over! And this is slow growing.



Name: josephine
Arlington, Texas (Zone 8a)
Hi Everybody!! Let us talk native.
Native Plants and Wildflowers Organic Gardener Butterflies Garden Ideas: Master Level Forum moderator I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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frostweed
Sep 10, 2015 2:54 PM CST

Moderator

It is good that you have a wet area, I think Buttonbush is beautiful and the butterflies love it.

I am also going to suggest Frostweed, Verbesina viginica, it is native to your state and great for butterflies as well.
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=VEVI3
Wildflowers are the Smiles of Nature.
Gardening with Texas Native Plants and Wildflowers.
Name: Cinda
Indiana Zone 5b
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gardengus
Sep 12, 2015 11:13 AM CST
I have felt your pain of having plants mowed over Sad

A lot of the mowing here is done by my DH (dear husband) and anything green is fair game ....but a rock would hurt his ''precious mower'' so I place nice field rocks near my ''precious plants'' and he sees the rocks and the plants are saved Thumbs up
If rocks are not your thing a paving stone 4X4'' painter with plant name or cute bug works too.
Keep believing ,hoping,and loving
all else is just existing.
Name: Christine
North East Texas (Zone 7b)
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wildflowers
Sep 17, 2015 4:12 PM CST

Moderator

I have the same problem with wildflowers. I try flagging them too but it doesn't always work, rocks do though - that's one thing dh looks for when he's on his riding mower.

I'm planning on putting this one in my cottage garden, it might be a good one for you too, hardy down to zone 4, it typically gets about 3 feet tall and wide.

New Jersey Tea (Ceanothus americanus)
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=CEAM
May your life be like a wildflower, growing freely in the beauty and joy of each day --Native American Proverb

Name: Cinda
Indiana Zone 5b
Dances with Dirt
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gardengus
Sep 17, 2015 4:35 PM CST
Looks like an interesting plant , I don't think I have seen any around here.
Keep believing ,hoping,and loving
all else is just existing.
Name: Kim
Iowa (Zone 5a)
I kill ornamentals... on purpose.
Enjoys or suffers cold winters Spiders! Critters Allowed Birds Houseplants I helped beta test the first seed swap
Region: Nebraska Keeper of Poultry Rabbit Keeper Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Procrastinator Garden Ideas: Level 2
Chillybean
Sep 17, 2015 5:37 PM CST
We'll see if my internet will allow posting now.

It looks like my Queen of the Prairie will bloom. It's rather late, but it was one of the earlier mow overs. I didn't think it would bounce back so well. I may have to find some large rocks. Smiling

I had to rule out the Frostweed. Sad We're just a tad too cold. I ordered the Gentian, plus other things. I am so glad the lady could translate my mispronunciations. I said Gen-tea-an. She said it's... if I can spell this... Gen-shun. It's not quite that, but close.

I have to wait another week to get the shrubs. I've been thinking about New Jersey Tea.

Name: josephine
Arlington, Texas (Zone 8a)
Hi Everybody!! Let us talk native.
Native Plants and Wildflowers Organic Gardener Butterflies Garden Ideas: Master Level Forum moderator I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member Plant Identifier Birds Cat Lover Xeriscape
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frostweed
Sep 17, 2015 6:28 PM CST

Moderator

I started New Jersey tea from cuttings from a friend and I am hoping that it will do well, it does grow wild around here.
Let me know how yours does. Smiling
Wildflowers are the Smiles of Nature.
Gardening with Texas Native Plants and Wildflowers.
Name: David Laderoute
Zone 5B/6 - NW MO (Zone 5b)
Ignoring Zones altogether
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DavidLMO
Oct 19, 2015 10:31 PM CST
@Chillybean

Gentians are lovely blue plants. They do not get very big though. And yes - gen-shun :-)

NJ Tea is a lovely shrub that stays on the smaller side. Check out American Beautyberry - a nifty shrub with pretty seeds. And Button bush is a nifty plant. Does best in wet locations, but that is not absolutely necessary.

Leadplant is usually a tuff plant, so don't know what the problem is there.

Partridge Pea can be quite invasive and looks awefully rasty after it finishes blooming.

The telephone line is likely 3 + feet down, so not sure what your problem is there. Your state has a Miss Dig or similar 800 line and they will come out and mark utilities - usually no or low cost.

Caralberry is Indian Currant AKA Buck Brush. It is not very desirable from a visual point of view. Can be terribly invasive and wildlife do not eat the berries unless they are starving. Most people eradicate it rather than intentionally plant it.

Why not a nice patch of Milkweed? 3 or 4 varieties would add interest and the blooms on most are quite attractive.
Seeking Feng Shui with my plants since 1976
Name: Kim
Iowa (Zone 5a)
I kill ornamentals... on purpose.
Enjoys or suffers cold winters Spiders! Critters Allowed Birds Houseplants I helped beta test the first seed swap
Region: Nebraska Keeper of Poultry Rabbit Keeper Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Procrastinator Garden Ideas: Level 2
Chillybean
Oct 20, 2015 9:36 AM CST
I don't know what the problem is with my leadplants, either.

About aggressiveness and ratty looking, those things are usually not a concern of mine since I am wanting to feed wildlife and insects. Though something was beginning to dig up the newly planted Black Cohosh. ??? That was a freebie, so it's ok.

So far, I've got patches of milkweeds, several varieties. The Monarchs did well this year.

I already got the Coralberry and it sounds like a winner for what I wanted it for. This is one thing it is host for,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemaris_thysbe and it feeds Bobwhites... oh, I like those birds!
Name: David Laderoute
Zone 5B/6 - NW MO (Zone 5b)
Ignoring Zones altogether
Seed Starter Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Level 1
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DavidLMO
Oct 20, 2015 11:23 AM CST
"About aggressiveness and ratty looking, " Gotcha. Smiling About 1/2 of my garden is I don't care what it looks like.

Digging up - big problem for me this year. Mainly cause of the lack of rain (none for a month) and my watering plants. Squirrels, chipmunks, moles, voles, etc will dig in the mpoist soil seeking both moisture and goodies to eat. I have had several scores of plants dug up exposing much of the root system. Pain.

Many of the moth cats that become hummingbird moths will eat a lot of things. This summer I found them on tomatos (of course), contorted filbert and Datura. But I never saw the moths. Sad Last summer, I saw them practically every day.

Do you have adequate hedges. etc for the Quail? In many cases habitat is of as much importance or more than food per se.

Cool on the Monarchs. It was a banner year for me too.
Seeking Feng Shui with my plants since 1976
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Oct 20, 2015 12:40 PM CST
I hate turf... Get rid of it and put it all in wildflowers!
Sell the mower...

Failing to go with something so drastic... Leaves me curious... Do you mulch?
Teaching mowing crews to stay away from the woodchips is difficult, but if it's a family member mowing...

I'm a big fan of Chamaecrista fasciculata (partridge pea), When in bloom, it's an absolute hive of bee activity early in the morning... Unfortunately, it's too dark to get a good photo... or video.

Keeping with the fabaceae group... Maybe a dalea? They seem to grow in Iowa... I have dalea pinnata, and absolutely love it...
http://gardens-in-the-sand.blogspot.com/2012/10/wildflowers-...

Additional pics:
http://stonethegardener.tumblr.com/tagged/Dalea-pinnata

[Last edited by stone - Oct 20, 2015 1:02 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #973294 (15)
Name: Kim
Iowa (Zone 5a)
I kill ornamentals... on purpose.
Enjoys or suffers cold winters Spiders! Critters Allowed Birds Houseplants I helped beta test the first seed swap
Region: Nebraska Keeper of Poultry Rabbit Keeper Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Garden Procrastinator Garden Ideas: Level 2
Chillybean
Oct 21, 2015 9:32 AM CST
We've had Bobwhites here before and have since that time planted more shrubs and vines to fill up along some fences. I hope they come back.

I don't like turf either, but a near phobia of ticks keeps lawn near the house. It's probably a good thing we have ticks as we stay out of the pasture during nesting season. We don't like disturbing nesting birds and but the temptation may get us if it wasn't for the ticks.

We have the dog variety that are active from April through August. Outside of those months, we roam the tall grasses without a problem. I am concerned with the deer that are starting to show up more. I hope they're not leaving the deer ticks behind that are active longer and more problematic.

It's one of several family members that mow. I show my husband all my new plantings but he cannot keep them straight. That was the reason for the orange flags. I had one in an odd location once, but he thought it was something the children did. He pulled it and mowed. I mulch sometimes, but not always.
Name: Alex Junge
MN st paul, (Zone 4a)
Plantsmylove
Jan 3, 2016 8:10 PM CST
Have a sit down heart to heart with your spouse tell him you would either like to do lawn duties or have him be paid a little for being careful

Be honest tell him why you like these plants and why they are importent if all else fails do what I do fense it up

loki
Feb 16, 2016 9:56 AM CST
I was reading this while also trying to get seeds for the 'prairie mimosa', 'Bundleflower' or Desmanthus illinoensis. We used it one year in our Native Plant Propagation Workshop, and it did really well. We had seeds from the arid west, though here is needs a wetter site to thrive. I did not end up getting it established for me though. It's sort of a sub-shrub, meaning that it will die down nearly completely, with a few woody caudices that will re-sprout. It can get very tall (5 feet or more), but you can trim it. It's beautiful. Needs sun, and likes it hot in the summer. Here's a site - look at the Plant Guide - link on lower left pdf http://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=deil as it's really helpful. Get seeds or plants from a source near you - not from the SE as it will be hardier. It's native to Iowa. Oh, and it sort of moves around with the conditions - like sensitive plant or sunflowers.

Roses - I am familiar with Woods Rose and Nootka rose here. They are nice plants. But you are planting a sure way to bleed. They are extremely thorny and catch you with recurved spines, that catch you rip into your flesh, and cause the rest of the branch, and ofter more to whip back and also catch you. They also get quite tall (12 feet, and spread widely). Maybe some of the native roses in your area are not so formidable. I like these in their place though. There are also lots of shrub roses, quite hardy, that are not native, but cultivars (some with native ancestry in them) that could work for you. These need hardly any care at all.
Name: David Laderoute
Zone 5B/6 - NW MO (Zone 5b)
Ignoring Zones altogether
Seed Starter Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Level 1
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DavidLMO
Feb 18, 2016 9:11 PM CST
You need/want Illinois Bundleflower? I have some extra.
Seeking Feng Shui with my plants since 1976

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