Ask a Question forum: What is wrong with my jade plant?

Page 1 of 2 • 1 2
Views: 756, Replies: 21 » Jump to the end
Tennessee
Ellen34
Jun 20, 2016 12:28 PM CST
I got this from my friend and it was full and the leaves were bright green. Since i repotted it, the leaves has been falling off and the leaves also got so many brown spots. I water it once every 2-3 weeks. I need help please. Thanks.
Thumb of 2016-06-20/Ellen34/dd4eb4
Thumb of 2016-06-20/Ellen34/bd00b9
Thumb of 2016-06-20/Ellen34/e957a9
Thumb of 2016-06-20/Ellen34/84a4e9

Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member Garden Procrastinator Greenhouse Dragonflies Plays in the sandbox I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
The WITWIT Badge I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Container Gardener Seed Starter
Image
woofie
Jun 20, 2016 12:34 PM CST
What sort of soil did you use when you repotted it? If it's too water retentive, that could be causing a problem.
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: Kat
Magnolia, Tx (Zone 8b)
Image
kittriana
Jun 20, 2016 2:18 PM CST
Jade plants are very sensitive to changes. Not sure where you are located...
kitt
Name: Katie Whitinger
Jacksonville, TX (Zone 8a)
Raises cows Dog Lover Farmer Keeper of Poultry Region: Texas The WITWIT Badge
Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
Image
Katie
Jun 20, 2016 4:51 PM CST
Make sure that your container has very good drainage. Jades don't like to have their feet wet all the time, and that can affect the growth. I would water more often, and in smaller amounts. Maybe once a week would be better. I had a Jade that looked just like yours, and then it started to grow back after I changed what I was doing.
Name: Lynn
Dallas, OR (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Garden Sages I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator I helped beta test the first seed swap Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant and/or Seed Trader Garden Ideas: Master Level Sempervivums
Image
valleylynn
Jun 20, 2016 5:25 PM CST
Once it recovers it should put out all new leaves. In fact it looks like it has already started to do that.
Tennessee
Ellen34
Jun 21, 2016 7:42 AM CST
woofie said:What sort of soil did you use when you repotted it? If it's too water retentive, that could be causing a problem.


I used a mixture of scotts potting soil, perlite, and coarse sand.
Thumb of 2016-06-21/Ellen34/7d129b

Tennessee
Ellen34
Jun 21, 2016 7:42 AM CST
kittriana said:Jade plants are very sensitive to changes. Not sure where you are located...


I am located in Tennessee.
Name: Anna Z.
Monroe, WI
Charter ATP Member Greenhouse Cat Lover Raises cows Region: Wisconsin
Image
AnnaZ
Jun 21, 2016 8:17 AM CST
I have a very big one and wanted to repot it. I decided to let it be in the pot it's in when I was told that they have VERY shallow root systems and they don't like them disturbed. It's doing great so I will leave it be.
Tennessee
Ellen34
Jun 21, 2016 6:27 PM CST
AnnaZ said:I have a very big one and wanted to repot it. I decided to let it be in the pot it's in when I was told that they have VERY shallow root systems and they don't like them disturbed. It's doing great so I will leave it be.


I had to repot this because it was getting so top heavy and pot was small... Hope my jade plant will fully recover.
Tennessee
Ellen34
Jun 21, 2016 6:30 PM CST
I am going to try my best to leave my jade plant alone and wait for it to recover. I did forget to mention that during thr winter time it was kept indoors but since it got hot, its been staying outside and i think that is when it started plus i do think i overwatered it too thats why the brown spots got worst. I am a newbie with the jade plant and if something happens to it i get sad. Sighing!
Name: Katie Whitinger
Jacksonville, TX (Zone 8a)
Raises cows Dog Lover Farmer Keeper of Poultry Region: Texas The WITWIT Badge
Hosted a Not-A-Raffle-Raffle
Image
Katie
Jun 23, 2016 7:02 AM CST
Keep an eye on it for a couple of days and let us know of any progress it makes.
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Region: California Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Composter
Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener Xeriscape
Image
tarev
Jun 23, 2016 7:25 PM CST
Hello Ellen34, give your plant some time, it is adjusting from growing indoors to outdoors and from the repot. It should start growing back leaves, either on each of those nodes or at the tips. It likes lots of sun when it has acclimated to the outside temps again. As also suggested already, water it once a week and let it drain very well, temps are warm enough already this summer. Usually if your temps just hovers in the low 80's once a week watering is more than enough for it. When you water, water direct on the root zone, not on the leaves, early part of the day, so it has enough time to drain properly.

As long as all of the branches and stems feels firm to your touch, it should be okay, Good luck!
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional interior landscaper
Image
WillC
Jun 25, 2016 10:35 AM CST
Jades rarely if ever need repotting. As mentioned previously, they do not like their roots disturbed. If you are new to plants, the chances are very good that you did not repot properly because repotting is not so simple as finding a bigger pot and filling it up with fresh soil. Unnecessary repotting is the single most common cause of plant problems, so keep that in mind for the future.

Jades do tend to become top heavy with their heavy, water-filled leaves. However the solution is not a bigger pot, but judicious pruning. Unlike repotting, pruning is not at all traumatic for plants.

I suggest that you start by removing the stones you put on the surface. The stones prevent the soil in the root zone from drying out soon enough. They also prevent you from probing the soil and determining when it is dry enough to water. Allow the soil to dry about halfway down from the top before adding any water. Do NOT water by the calendar or any other predetermined schedule. If you have it outside, keep it shaded at all times.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
[url=www.HorticulturalHelp.com]www.HorticulturalHelp.com[/url]
Name: Tiffany
Opp, AL (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
Bulbs Foliage Fan Tropicals Butterflies Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents
Image
purpleinopp
Jun 27, 2016 10:47 AM CST
Once acclimated to it, any Jade would prefer to be in the sun all day, though plants that never go outside can be gorgeous also, with a more relaxed appearance. Putting an inside plant (of Jade or any other kind of plant, even an oak tree) suddenly into the mid-day summer sun without having acclimated it gradually first will cause burning.
http://garden.org/thread/go/49974/
👀😁😂 - SMILE! -☺😎☻☮👌✌∞☯🐣🐦🐔🐝🍯🐾
🍀👒☀🍄🍍🌱🌿🌴🎄👣🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻🌽🏡🍃🍂🌾🌿🍁❦❧ 🍃🍁🍂🌾🌻🌺🌸🌼🌹🌳🌲
☕👓 The only way to succeed is to try.
Tennessee
Ellen34
Jun 28, 2016 10:43 AM CST
Thank you all so much, i will definitely remember all this if not, ill come back and reread all you have written/ suggested. I am a first timer and i am learning. Thanks again.

Update about the plant, it does show some signs of improvements, i saw a few growth, new leaves on them, color becoming brighter green again eventhough brown spots are still visible. Will update and will take pics when it will be full again, hopefully.
Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member Garden Procrastinator Greenhouse Dragonflies Plays in the sandbox I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
The WITWIT Badge I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Container Gardener Seed Starter
Image
woofie
Jun 28, 2016 11:24 AM CST
Just a hint, if you're not aware of the "star" function. You can make it easier to find this thread if you click on the star (it's right next to the acorn symbol and "thumbs up" icon at the bottom of each post) on one of the posts in the thread. The star will turn yellow. When you want to find it again, just go to your profile and click on "starred pages" in the box titled "Some info about (member name)." Smiling
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Tennessee
Ellen34
Jun 28, 2016 6:44 PM CST
Thanks, i see it...
Tennessee
Ellen34
Jul 24, 2016 8:03 AM CST
Here is how my jade plant looks since June 21. I am happy that the bright green leaves are back even though there are still brown spots atleast new leaves are growing...
Thumb of 2016-07-24/Ellen34/b19cfe
Thumb of 2016-07-24/Ellen34/06ed9d
Thank You! Thank You! all for your help. Hurray!

Name: Laurie Basler
Western Washington (Zone 7b)
Houseplants Region: Pacific Northwest Sedums Orchids
Image
lauriebasler
Jul 24, 2016 11:04 AM CST
I just felt so sad for you. I had a Jade do this years ago. I just felt sorry for myself and threw it away. I am so glad you are going to be able to save it. Great green thumb. Thumbs up
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Bromeliad
Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier
Image
Baja_Costero
Jul 24, 2016 12:06 PM CST
WillC said:Jades rarely if ever need repotting. <snip!> Unnecessary repotting is the single most common cause of plant problems


This is untrue and unhelpful. How do you think your jade plant ended up in the pot it is in? It had to come from somewhere. I repot a dozen plants a week without any problems whatsoever. Perhaps if I explain a bit, the thinking will become clear. There is absolutely no reason to have a phobia of larger pots or regular repotting. These are useful tools and techniques. You need to know the right time and place, but that's true for anything in the garden. Repotting is something to do when a plant is growing well and getting large for the size of the pot, not usually a great idea when a plant is in crisis or somehow suffering from a serious health problem.

First, one thing to bear in mind is that most succulents are slow growing plants. They take years to reach a good size. Jade plants are no exception. They do not need any kind of frequent intervention to do just fine. But they will slow down and reach a point of frustration when the pot size is too small. After several years there is a very real growth arrest. I would invite anyone who's curious to do the simple experiment of placing a small pot alongside a larger pot, let two plants grow alongside each other, and observe what happens to the plants over the course of months to years. I do these sorts of experiments constantly (not usually on purpose) because I make every effort to use the smallest pot possible for my plants (see below).

Second important point is that there are different ways to repot plants, and they are not equal. The simplest repotting (what I would do for a jade) would be to remove the plant from the pot it's in, with the root ball completely intact, and drop it in a bigger pot with more soil. This would be the most noninvasive route, and it leads to absolutely no disturbance of the health of the plant. A more involved repotting might require the loosening of the roots and the removal of the soil, and this is where you have to bear in mind that injured roots (an inevitable part of this more invasive process) are sensitive and need time to recover. So you want to leave them alone in their new pot without watering for a week or more. When in doubt, choose this route. If you consider the plant in human terms, the last thing you would want to do with an open wound would be to soak it in dirty water. But these are most resilient plants and they will recover very nicely in a couple of weeks. Watering prematurely, not the repotting itself, is the source of danger.

Third, and this is at the core of the question of when to repot, healthy jades and other succulents will follow a natural course of growth in containers. They burst out at first in new soil, then slow down as the part above ground gets larger, and eventually reach a sort of equilibrium where they are only putting out as many new leaves as they need to keep going. There's a certain kind of fetish in the succulent community relating to small pots, and you will see lots of succulents in bonsai pots at plant shows. Some plants really do thrive under these conditions, because they make shallow roots and enjoy frequent water. Other plants are less malleable, and they may look great in a tiny container but they don't do much growing in it. Jades are large shrubs in the ground here and they fall into this second category. When in doubt, consider the growth habit of the plant and its eventual size in nature when you are trying to decide on what size pot to use. A plant that never gets big in nature will never require a large pot in cultivation.

Fourth, and related to why I always try to use the smallest pots practical in my own growing... there is a cost issue related to pot size which is good to bear in mind when the numbers get big. Every jump in pot size (say from 4" to 5" to 6") comes with a doubling of the volume, more or less, which means twice as much soil fits in the space. So by aiming on the small side, you can save a lot of money. The downside is that when you do this, you have to be hyper attentive to the needs of the plants, and when they are genuinely being held back by the size of the container. More frequent repotting. In many cases you will get a bigger plant sooner if you put one in a large pot to start with, but that's a price I'm willing to pay to save money. This relates to the question of "necessary", which is just as flexible a term as you can imagine.

Whatever pot you use for any given plant, the critical relationship is the one between the size of the roots and the size of the container. This relates to watering frequency. When there's a good fit (not too loose not too tight) the soil will dry out relatively quickly, and you can water relatively often, waiting until the soil is dry or almost dry each time. When the roots only occupy a small fraction of the soil volume, the pot will hold onto water longer. The danger there is that if you're not careful, you can easily overwater a plant in that situation, which results in the bottom staying wet all the time... something jades do not enjoy. Overwatering is the real danger. You can manage a wide variety of pot shapes and sizes if you know when is the right time to water.

Strong light (hours of sun indoors) makes watering easier and results in a better looking plant.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Jul 24, 2016 1:23 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1222640 (20)

Page 1 of 2 • 1 2

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Today's site banner is by Whitebeard and is called "variegated impatiens"