Tropicals forum: How to tell the difference between male and female papaya

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sanjibbaro
Jun 23, 2016 9:43 PM CST
hi sir . I want to know how will know that papaya male & female tree? I want to make papaya garden if possible then please sir/ madam kindly help me .
[Last edited by dave - Jun 24, 2016 5:36 AM (+)]
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Name: Lynn
Dallas, OR (Zone 8b)
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valleylynn
Jun 23, 2016 9:48 PM CST
Hi Sanjib Baro.
Welcome to NGA, glad you found your way here.

Here is a link to an interesting discussion on this topic.
The thread "Will this papaya tree bear fruit?" in Tropicals forum
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
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dyzzypyxxy
Jun 23, 2016 10:07 PM CST
You can't tell what you have until they bloom. Male papaya plants have panicles (long stems) with many small fragrant flowers on them. Female papayas have larger single flowers close to the stem of the plant. If you have male and female plants in your garden they will pollinate but you will get fruit only from the female plants.

But sometimes they have both kinds of flowers or "complete" flowers that will self-pollinate and then you don't need both kinds. In places where they grow papayas commercially, they remove any that are not "complete" also known as hermaphrodites and only keep the self-pollinating plants because then you will get fruit from every plant.

If you start your papayas from the seeds of one that was commercially grown, the chances are pretty good you will get some self-pollinating plants.

Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Lynn
Dallas, OR (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Garden Sages I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator I helped beta test the first seed swap Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant and/or Seed Trader Garden Ideas: Master Level Sempervivums
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valleylynn
Jun 23, 2016 10:38 PM CST
Great information Elaine.
Name: KadieD
Oceania, Mariana Islands (Zone 11b)
Wet Tropical AHS Zone 12
Adeniums Tropicals Morning Glories Container Gardener Seed Starter Garden Ideas: Level 1
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Rainbow
Jun 24, 2016 12:27 AM CST
dyzzypyxxy said:You can't tell what you have until they bloom. Male papaya plants have panicles (long stems) with many small fragrant flowers on them. Female papayas have larger single flowers close to the stem of the plant. If you have male and female plants in your garden they will pollinate but you will get fruit only from the female plants.

But sometimes they have both kinds of flowers or "complete" flowers that will self-pollinate and then you don't need both kinds. In places where they grow papayas commercially, they remove any that are not "complete" also known as hermaphrodites and only keep the self-pollinating plants because then you will get fruit from every plant.

If you start your papayas from the seeds of one that was commercially grown, the chances are pretty good you will get some self-pollinating plants.


Looking at the plants' flowers, how does one tell the difference between hermaphrodite and complete?
Name: Elaine
South Sarasota, Florida (Zone 9b)
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Jun 24, 2016 7:00 AM CST
Kadie, I had to remove my papaya last winter as it got too tall and fell over. So I don't have a picture to show you. But the simple answer is to look for both stamens and pistils. The flowers are pretty big, so it's fairly obvious if you have a complete flower. The stamens are the long, filament like things coming from the center of the flower and the pistil is the part with the ovary that will receive pollen.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Lynn
Dallas, OR (Zone 8b)
Charter ATP Member Garden Sages I helped plan and beta test the plant database. I helped beta test the Garden Planting Calendar I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Plant Database Moderator
Forum moderator I helped beta test the first seed swap Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant and/or Seed Trader Garden Ideas: Master Level Sempervivums
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valleylynn
Jun 24, 2016 9:58 AM CST
There are some great photos in our database.
Female blooms on trunk of tree

Papaya (Carica papaya)

Male blooms suspended on long stalks


Entry showing more photos.
Papaya (Carica papaya)
Name: KadieD
Oceania, Mariana Islands (Zone 11b)
Wet Tropical AHS Zone 12
Adeniums Tropicals Morning Glories Container Gardener Seed Starter Garden Ideas: Level 1
Dog Lover Cat Lover Bee Lover Vegetable Grower Butterflies Permaculture
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Rainbow
Jun 24, 2016 12:18 PM CST
Thank you guys. I asked about hermaphrodites because I had never heard the term used for papayas...now I understand.

Hermaphrodites have the "complete" flowers...they self-pollinate. Female papaya plants need pollen from a male or hermaphrodite flower to have fruit. This site shows the differences via pictures:
http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/F_N-5.pdf

We have been growing papaya trees for many years, and whenever a male should show up we cut it down since these do not produce fruit. And because we grow several trees at a time the chances of getting hermaphrodites is good. (Learned something new.)

Two years ago we planted 10 seedlings (Red Lady) we bought from Dept. of Agriculture. Nine were planted in close proximity of each other...the 10th was planted nearly 200 feet away. When they started blooming only the 9 planted together produced fruit, the 10th one didn't produce fruit until we hand-pollinated from flowers of the former. Obviously the 10th was a female.

We have several young papaya trees that are starting to produce fruit. The largest one I am fairly certain is a hermaphrodite...there are clusters of small flowers in the axils of the leaves. Come daylight (couple of hours from now), I'll take and post pictures of the flowers and fruits.


Name: KadieD
Oceania, Mariana Islands (Zone 11b)
Wet Tropical AHS Zone 12
Adeniums Tropicals Morning Glories Container Gardener Seed Starter Garden Ideas: Level 1
Dog Lover Cat Lover Bee Lover Vegetable Grower Butterflies Permaculture
Image
Rainbow
Jun 24, 2016 7:56 PM CST
Here's a picture of one of my papaya trees with fruits.
Thumb of 2016-06-25/Rainbow/d66d0d

See what I mean about the small flowers in large clusters...looks like hermaphrodite. If it was a female it would have one or two very large blooms per leaf axil.

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