Ask a Question forum: new rose bush leaves are wilting after a month

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Name: chris nowak
north east ,pa. (outside of
pharmboy31
Jul 15, 2016 4:41 AM CST
plant a climbing root rose soaked the root for a day planted it leaves came out quickly. now after a month the leaves on one are wilted and now the other side is starting
chris nowak
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Jul 15, 2016 4:52 AM CST
Welcome! If you soaked the root, and it didn't have leaves when you planted it in mid-June it sounds like it may have been a packaged bare-root rose from a retail store? If so, with the hot weather it may be losing more water from the leaves than it can take up from the limited roots. Is there any way you can shade it temporarily? I assume you are still watering it?
[Last edited by sooby - Jul 15, 2016 4:53 AM (+)]
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Name: chris nowak
north east ,pa. (outside of
pharmboy31
Jul 15, 2016 7:54 PM CST
it wasn't in the direct sun. and it had plenty of water. when I dug around the rose it was like a hard mud so I loosened the soil and cut off the wilted leaves.the next leaves in line have a yellow circle on them now
chris nowak
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
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RickCorey
Jul 15, 2016 8:03 PM CST
"Hard mud"sounds awful. It sounds like that would drown the roots, cut of any air from reaching them. Drown, then die, then rot. Not good. The roots need to be in soil that drains, so water can flow down and out. Then air can flow in. Roots need to breath.

One way to get drainage is to RAISE the root ball. Make a raised bed with some kind of walls (or even just mounded up soil). The soil in the bed should be somewhat loose, at least enough to drain and be aerated. For example, add compost and something coarse and gritty, to improve drainage, if you have clay now.

Another way, if you have some slope to work with, is to LOWER the "water table", or at least lower the level that water can rise to after a heavy rain.

Approach the bed from BELOW it, making a slit trench between your bed and some lower part of the yard. The floor of that trench has to go in a little lower than the floor of your bed. Now water can drain from the bed into the trench, until the water level in the bed is as low as the floor of the trench. That lets air into the bed.
Name: chris nowak
north east ,pa. (outside of
pharmboy31
Jul 15, 2016 8:10 PM CST
thanks rick that makes sense
chris nowak
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
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RickCorey
Jul 18, 2016 12:20 PM CST
I always obsess about drainage, maybe because I like digging around and "engineering" my beds.

But also because I garden on the rock-hard clay, no-drainage-clay that was left behind by the bulldozers after they 'dozed the park. I wonder where all that topsoil was moved to?

>> when I dug around the rose it was like a hard mud so I loosened the soil

Adding compost on TOP of clay will gradually soften and loosen the clay beneath. Like, over a few years.

That will be speeded up if you can arrange for the clay to DRAIN, which lets air into it, which allows roots and worms to penetrate it sooner.

Sometimes people plant into clay and then wonder why the plant can't take up water: it's sitting in a big puddle of water! The extra water excludes air from the soil, so the roots they just planted drown, die and rot.

The leaves wilt since there are few LIVING roots or root hairs to take up water.
People think "wilting means it needs more water", and pour more water on top of the drowning roots.

Sometimes a plant dieing of thirst means that the root zone has TOO MUCH water.
Name: Kat
Magnolia, Tx (Zone 8b)
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kittriana
Jul 18, 2016 2:44 PM CST
Attaboy Rick! Great info! May I add that roses are infamous for loving water, but like dry feet? Another way to say drainage...
kitt
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Vegetable Grower
Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Charter ATP Member
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RickCorey
Jul 18, 2016 3:46 PM CST
Thank You!

*Blush*

And thank you for the acorn!

[Last edited by RickCorey - Jul 18, 2016 3:46 PM (+)]
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