Wild Garlic

By Barbara Pleasant

Wild garlic (Allium vineale) grows in fall and spring in lawns, fields, and gardens in all but the coldest climates. Often called wild onion, this plant is native to Europe. Wild garlic is especially noticeable in dormant, warm-season lawns or near long-lived perennials. Dig plants in fall or spring, carefully lifting plants from beneath to get the roots and little corms, which will grow into new plants. In early summer, brush survivors with a glyphosate herbicide.

Weed Control Techniques

Digging. Weeds that regrow from persistent roots must be dug. Use a spade or digging fork to dig spreading perennials, such as bindweed, Canada thistle, and quackgrass. Start digging a foot away from the plant's center to loosen the soil. Then lift the weed from beneath, which reduces how many root pieces are likely to break off and regrow. Dandelion, dock, and other weeds that grow from persistent taproots can be dug the same way, or you can use a special fork-like tool called a dandelion weeder to pry them up. Dig very large taproots that are difficult to pry loose. In lawns and other places where digging dandelions is not practical, use a sharp knife to slice off the leaves and the top inch or two of taproot at a diagonal angle. Some weeds that are easily pulled when the soil is moist must be dug from dry soil.

Glyphosate herbicide. It is safer to use a strong herbicide to control a dangerous weed such as poison ivy than to engage in hand-to-hand combat. Mix a small amount of glyphosate herbicide according to label directions, and use a paintbrush to ″paint″ weed leaves on a warm day when rain is not expected for at least 48 hours. Be careful, because spills and splatters also will injure or kill other plants. Ready-to-use glyphosate sprays are another option, but spraying with this chemical should be done only in still weather. A small amount of wind can carry the spray to nearby garden plants. As an extra precaution, surround the weed with a bottomless cardboard box before applying herbicide. Do not use glyphosate near water, and limit your use to dangerous plants, such as poison ivy. Glyphosate works by interfering with photosynthesis, so plants die slowly over a period of several days.

Image courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons, wlcutler

Other Broadleaf Weeds
Black Medic
Weed info for Black Medic
Broadleaf Plantain
Weed info for Broadleaf Plantain
Buckhorn Plantain
Weed info for Buckhorn Plantain
Buttonweed
Weed info for Buttonweed
Canada Thistle
Weed info for Canada Thistle
Carpetweed
Weed info for Carpetweed
Chickweed
Weed info for Chickweed
Cinquefoil
Weed info for Cinquefoil
Corn Speedwell
Weed info for Corn Speedwell
Curly Dock
Weed info for Curly Dock
Dandelion
Weed info for Dandelion
English Daisy
Weed info for English Daisy
Ground Ivy
Weed info for Ground Ivy
Hawkweed
Weed info for Hawkweed
Henbit
Weed info for Henbit
Hop Clover
Weed info for Hop Clover
Horsetail
Weed info for Horsetail
Indian Mockstrawberry
Weed info for Indian Mockstrawberry
Lambsquarters
Weed info for Lambsquarters
Mallow
Weed info for Mallow
Pigweed
Weed info for Pigweed
Prickly Lettuce
Weed info for Prickly Lettuce
Prostrate Knotweed
Weed info for Prostrate Knotweed
Purslane
Weed info for Purslane
Ragweed
Weed info for Ragweed
Shepherd's Purse
Weed info for Shepherd's Purse
Smartweed
Weed info for Smartweed
Sorrel
Weed info for Sorrel
White Clover
Weed info for White Clover
Wild Garlic
Weed info for Wild Garlic
Wild Violets
Weed info for Wild Violets
Woodsorrel
Weed info for Woodsorrel
Yarrow
Weed info for Yarrow

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